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Trump pushes to expand use of medication to treat addiction

Channel 10 news - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 15:43

Deep within President Donald Trump's plan to combat opioid abuse, overshadowed by his call for the death penalty for some drug traffickers, is a push to expand the use of medication to treat addiction.

It's a rare instance in which Trump isn't trying to dismantle Obama administration policies, and where fractious Republicans and Democrats in Congress have come together.

Trump declared last month that "we're making medically assisted treatment more available and affordable," even as Congress was working to approve $1 billion for a new treatment grant program for opioids as part of the massive government funding bill.

Not to offer such treatment is like "trying to treat an infection without antibiotics," new Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar told the National Governors Association earlier this year.

Experts have long argued that medication-assisted treatment should be the standard of care for people addicted to heroin and other opioid drugs. But acceptance lags. Cost is a barrier, as are government regulations. Some of the medications are opioids themselves and there's no consensus on how long patients should remain in treatment.

In its final year, the Obama administration pushed through Congress $1 billion for opioid crisis grants to states. Of that, $500 million was to be released last year and the other $500 million this year. States had to show that their opioid programs are based on clinical evidence, so medication-assisted treatment got a big boost.

The 2018 spending bill provides another $1 billion, and the Trump administration says it will carry even more specific requirements for states to use treatment supported by clinical evidence, including medications.

"The government is talking about treatment and medication-assisted treatment in a way that the government has never done before," said Tom Hill, vice president of addiction and recovery at the National Council for Behavioral Health, which advocates for mental health and addiction treatment.

Overdose deaths from heroin, synthetics like fentanyl, and prescription painkillers, reached 42,000 in 2016, according to the latest statistics.

"This is being addressed as the illness that it is," said Elinore McCance-Katz, assistant secretary of HHS for mental health and substance abuse. "Most definitely the government is acknowledging the disease of addiction as it pertains to opioids — and other substances as well — but opioids of course are an emergency."

Grants are awarded to states based on a variety of factors, including overdose deaths and the number of people who can't find treatment.

A study looking at New England by the nonprofit Institute for Clinical and Economic Review found that every dollar invested in medication treatment would return about $1.80 in savings, when factoring in society's costs from lost productivity and crime.

Vermont has been hard hit by the addiction epidemic and is among states that have previously gotten federal money for medication-assisted treatment. Its central goal is to improve access, according to a federal report. In Massachusetts, the plan is aimed in part at pregnant women and new mothers. Indiana wants to focus on rural residents.

One Vermont physician, Dr. Deborah Richter, says medications have helped her patients, especially when combined with counseling.

"People got back to what they were before the addiction seized them," she said.

As a doctor, "it was on a personal level so rewarding to save other mothers' children."

Skeptics of the government emphasis on medication-assisted treatment say it's not a cure-all.

Jonathan Goyer, manager of the Anchor recovery program in Pawtucket, Rhode Island, said he sees many patients who don't want to take medication, because they want to be free of drugs altogether.

"We should be increasing medication-assisted treatment," said Goyer. "But we should also be increasing everything else."

At the Neil Kennedy Recovery Centers in Youngstown, Ohio, outpatient director Pam Ramsey said her program emphasizes medication as an aid, not as the sole treatment.

"It really is an assist to the treatment," said Ramsey. Along with medication, treatment incorporates a version of the traditional 12-step approach to quitting, counseling sessions, group meetings, and follow-up. "Our goal is still abstinence."

Home remodeling contractor Rob Judy said he's wrestled with heroin addiction for more than 20 years. Medication alone did not keep him drug free, nor did a faith-based program.

Finally Judy signed up for comprehensive treatment at Neil Kennedy.

The medication puts out "the fire of active addiction, of having to wake up and use," said Judy. But he says that needs to be followed with counseling, peer support and follow-up care.

"I believe that addiction is based on and driven by loss, and at the core of it is pain," said Judy. "If you don't address those issues, sooner or later you're going to relapse."

Categories: Ohio News

Reports: Police moved past deputies to enter Florida school

Channel 10 news - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 15:38

When Coral Springs police officer Gil Monzon arrived at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School minutes after a gunman unleashed a massacre that killed 17, he says he found two Broward County sheriff's deputies in the parking lot.

He asked for the shooter's location, and was told they didn't know, but he could see a body next to the freshman building at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, and bullet marks in its third-floor windows. He said in reports released Monday that he and three other Coral Springs officers immediately went to the building, checked the body and then entered, where they immediately found a victim standing against a wall and then falling to the floor.

The four pages written by three officers detail what they found when they arrived at the Feb. 14 shooting that also left 17 wounded. They corroborate earlier reports that the first Broward deputies at the scene failed to enter the building to confront the gunman and assist the wounded.

Officer Tim Burton, the first on-duty Coral Springs officer to arrive, grabbed his rifle and was directed toward the freshman building, where he found Deputy Scot Peterson, the school's security officer, taking cover behind a concrete column.

He said Peterson told him he had not heard any shots for several minutes, but to watch his back, that the shooter might be in the parking lot.

Peterson would soon retire from his deputy job under criticism from Sheriff Scott Israel, who said he should have immediately entered the building to find the killer. Parents, meanwhile, speculated that victims on the third floor could have survived had first responders reached them more quickly: Ryan Petty, whose daughter Alaina died in the attack, tweeted over the weekend, "6 on the 3rd may have lived if anyone had gone in."

Monzon said that after dragging the victim who collapsed out of the building, he and three other officers went back inside.

"The hallway was quiet and full of thick smoke from gunfire," he wrote. They found a female hiding in an office and led her outside.

By then, another team of Coral Springs officers entered the building from the other side, so to avoid accidentally firing at each other, Monzon and his team moved to the second floor, where they found students and teachers hiding in classrooms. Still unsure if the gunman was in the building, they left survivors locked in classrooms and moved to the third floor, where Monzon said he "encountered several deceased students throughout the hall." He was then sent to help clear a nearby building.

On Friday, the Broward Sheriff's Office released its own reports from deputies, including one who sped four miles from another school and joined Coral Springs officers searching the freshman building. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement also is preparing a report on the overall law enforcement response.

Police say Nikolas Cruz, 19, a former Stoneman Douglas student, committed the mass shooting and then fled the building after his gun jammed. They say he joined students as they ran to the street and he was captured an hour later about a mile away. His attorneys have said he would plead guilty to 17 counts of murder in exchange for life without parole. Prosecutors have said they will seek the death penalty.

Categories: Ohio News

18-year-old arrested for impersonating a firefighter in Marysville

Channel 10 news - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 14:41

MARYSVILLE -- An 18-year-old man was arrested for allegedly impersonating a firefighter in Marysville over the weekend.

According to a release, on April 14, the Union County Sheriff’s Office received a complaint from the Marysville Fire Department concerning an individual showing up at several EMS calls and was not a member of their department.

The suspect has been identified as Tony L. Beverly, 18, of West Mansfield.

At approximately 7:07 p.m. on Saturday, the Marysville Fire Department responded to an EMS call at the New Dover Mobile Home Park in the 11000 block of U.S. 36.

A person was found inside the home with the patient and identified himself as a volunteer firefighter. He was reported to be wearing firefighter bunker pants and had a fire department radio pager with him. During the course of the investigation, it was determined the suspect allegedly lied to Marysville Fire Department personnel about his name and fire department affiliation.

The suspect claimed he was a volunteer firefighter with the Bokes Creek Fire Department in Logan County, but was found to have been terminated from that department in 2016, the release said.

The suspect was located at about noon April 15, walking on U.S. 36 near Whitestone Road.

Beverly was arrested for an outstanding warrant from the Logan County Sheriff’s Office for breaking and entering. He was turned over to a Logan County Sheriff's deputy.

During the investigation, Beverly was in possession of firefighter turnout gear, allegedly stolen during a Logan County break-in. The Union County Sheriff’s Office has charged Beverly with Impersonating a Fire Fighter, a misdemeanor of the first degree; and Misconduct at an Emergency, a misdemeanor of the fourth degree.

Categories: Ohio News

Coroner identifies man killed in Pickerington house fire

Channel 10 news - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 14:07

PICKERINGTON -- The Fairfield County Coroner identified the man killed in a house fire in Pickerington on April 8.

The man was identified as 60-year-old John Peter Letourneau.

The Fairfield County Sheriff's Office and State Fire Marshal are seeking tips from the public after Letourneau died in the Fairfield County house fire.

A passerby reported the fire just before 5 a.m. in the 6200 block of Blacklick Eastern Road.

The Fire Chief with Violet Township said one man out of the three people that lived in the house didn't make it.

Investigators believe the suspect from a nearby burglary may have information relating to the fire. A warrant for 21-year-old Raeqwan Hancock has been issued regarding an April 6 burglary on Toll Gate Road in Violet Township.

Anyone with information is asked to contact the State Fire Marshal's tip line at 800-589-2728 or Fairfield County Sheriff's Office at 740-652-7911.

Categories: Ohio News

Local Syrian-American woman speaks out after US air strike on Syria

Channel 10 news - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 14:06

Local Syrian-Americans are reacting to Friday's air strike, saying it's not enough.

One woman says the U.S. needs to do more because, despite the strike, supporters of the Syrian President are still celebrating in the streets.

"We are going to keep our hopes very low until like, we see something happen," Sumaya Hamadmad said.

Sumaya Hamadmad says she feels like she's talking in circles, but she'll keep speaking out until something changes.

"Nobody is willing to stop him and all we do is just empty talk," Hamadmad said.

Hamadmad says she's become desensitized to the violence happening in Syria. She still has family there. So do her friends.

"Every single one of my friends has lost a friend or family, including me," she said.

Hamadmad says the Syrian-American community in central Ohio had hope after Friday's air strike on Syria.

For her, that hope has since faded.

"Now the supporters of Assad are celebrating in Syria, they're celebrating a triumph over the U.S.," Hamadmad said.

Hamadmad felt the same way last year when she spoke to 10TV after the U.S. took action against Syria in April.

"We always read stories of the Holocaust and we say how did we let this happen, what would we do if this was repeated and this has been repeated every day in Syria. Even gassing of children is repeated and we're doing nothing," she said.

Until the U.S. does more to intervene and the killings in Syria, Hamadmad says she'll just keep talking even if it is in circles.

"What are we doing as an international community if we're letting this to happen for so long. You have to keep the fact and providing evidence and hoping that someday something happens," Hamadmad said.

Categories: Ohio News

Convicted ex-high school athlete wants off sex offender list

Channel 10 news - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 12:49

A judge will decide whether a man convicted as a juvenile of raping a 16-year-old girl during an alcohol-fueled party should be removed from Ohio's sex offender listings, as allowed by law.

Judge Thomas Lipps scheduled a hearing Thursday in juvenile court in Steubenville in the case of former high school football player Ma'Lik Richmond.

Richmond, now 21, was convicted in 2013 of raping the West Virginia girl at a party that followed a football scrimmage the previous year. He served a one-year sentence and later rejoined the Steubenville football team. He went on to play at Youngstown State University.

After his conviction, Richmond was ordered to register his address every six months for the next 20 years. In 2014, Lipps agreed to reclassify him so that he has to register only once a year for the next decade.

Ohio law allows juveniles to request removal altogether. Richmond's public defender declined to comment ahead of the hearing. The state opposes the request.

A second juvenile convicted in the crime served a two-year sentence. His attorneys plan a similar request in the future.

The 2012 case drew international attention because of the role of social media publicizing the assault, and initial allegations of a cover-up by local authorities and frustration that more football players weren't charged, including some who witnessed the assaults.

Richmond was released from prison in January 2014 and attended colleges in West Virginia and Pennsylvania before transferring to Youngstown State in the fall of 2016 as a sophomore.

Last year, Youngstown State sidelined Richmond after getting backlash about him playing football. After Richmond sued, a settlement with the university allowed him to stay on the active roster. Richmond is currently a student and a football player, Youngstown State spokesman Ron Cole said Monday.

As that controversy played out, Richmond's father, Nathaniel Richmond, was killed in August 2017 in an unrelated confrontation when he shot a judge in a courthouse parking lot and a probation officer returned fire. The judge had been overseeing a wrongful death lawsuit the father filed against a housing authority.

Categories: Ohio News

Denmark’s EDR Offers Award for World Amateur Radio Day Contacts with 5P0WARD

ARRL News - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 12:39

World Amateur Radio Day is Wednesday, April 18, and EDR, Denmark’s International Amateur Radio Union (IARU) Member-Society, is sponsoring the 5P0WARD Award for working 5P0WARD/xx stations between 0000 and 2400 UTC.

Stations in Europe qualify for a gold award by contacting 12 different 5P0WARD/xx stations on at least four different bands. For silver, work 10 different 5P0WARD/xx stations on at le...

Categories: Amateur Radio News

IARU President Extends Greetings for World Amateur Radio Day 2018

ARRL News - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 12:36

Wednesday, April 18, is World Amateur Radio Day (WARD), this year marking the 93rd anniversary of the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU), founded in Paris in 1925. Each year, WARD celebrates Amateur Radio’s contribution to society.

“World Amateur Radio Day is an opportunity for our member-societies to show our capabilities and promote the use of Amateur Radio, both on the air and through ...

Categories: Amateur Radio News

OSHP: Crash shuts down I-71 NB, north of Polaris

Channel 10 news - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 11:58

DELAWARE COUNTY -- A multiple-vehicle crash has shut down I-71 northbound north of Polaris, according to the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

The crash involves four vehicles according to dispatchers and it at about mile marker 126.

In total, six injuried were reported and all six people were taken to area hospitals.

All the lanes reopened at 3 p.m.

The call came in at 1:20 p.m.

Stay with 10TV and 10TV.com as this story develops.

Categories: Ohio News

Desi Linden wins Boston Marathon, 1st US woman since '85

Channel 10 news - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 11:31

BOSTON — Desiree Linden splashed her way through icy rain and a near-gale headwind to win the Boston Marathon on Monday, the first victory for an American woman since 1985.

The two-time Olympian and 2011 Boston runner-up pulled away at the end of Heartbreak Hill to win in 2 hours, 39 minutes, 54 seconds. That was more than four minutes better than second-place finisher Sarah Sellers — one of seven Americans in the top 10 — but the slowest time for a women's winner in Boston since 1978.

"It's supposed to be hard," said Linden, who wiped the spray of rain from her eyes as she made her way down Boylston Street alone. "It's good to get it done."

Yuki Kawauchi passed defending champion Geoffrey Kirui as they passed through Kenmore Square with a mile to go to win the men's race in 2:15:58 and earn Japan's first Boston Marathon title since 1987. Kirui slowed and stumbled across the Copley Square finish line 2:25 later, followed by Shadrack Biwott and three other U.S. men.

"For me, it's the best conditions possible," Kawauchi said with a wide smile through an interpreter.

On the fifth anniversary of the finish line explosions that killed three and wounded hundreds more, Linden and Kawauchi led a field of 30,000 runners through a drenching rain, temperatures in the mid-30s and gusts of up to 32 mph on the 26.2-mile trek from Hopkinton.

In Copley Square, Crowds only partly thinned and muffled by the weather greeted Linden with chants of "U-S-A!"

Lisa Larsen Weidenbach's 1985 victory was the last for an American woman — before the race began offering prize money that lured the top international competitors to the world's oldest and most prestigious annual marathon. Linden, a California native who lives in Michigan, nearly ended the drought in 2011 when she was outkicked down Boylston Street and finished second by 2 seconds during yet another Kenyan sweep.

But the East Africans who have dominated the professional era of the race had their worst performance in decades. Kirui was the only Kenyan in the top ten for the men's race; defending champion Edna Kiplagat, who was ninth, helped prevent a shutout in the distaff division.

Hometown favorite Shalane Flanagan, a four-time Olympian and the reigning New York City Marathon champion, finished sixth after popping into a course-side portable toilet before the halfway point and falling behind the lead pack.

Marcel Hug of Switzerland earned his fifth wheelchair victory, pushing though puddles that sent the spray from their wheels into his eyes. American Tatyana McFadden, won the women's wheelchair race for the fifth time, wore two jackets, with a layer of plastic between them and hand warmers against her chest.

"It was just tough, it was so freezing," Hug said through chattering teeth as a volunteer draped a second towel around his shoulders. "I'm just very glad that I made it."

Categories: Ohio News

Trump hosted tax reform roundtable in Florida

Channel 10 news - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 10:06

WASHINGTON — President Trump hosted a roundtable with small business leaders in Hialeah, Florida on Monday to promote the $1.5 trillion tax cut package pushed through by Republicans at the end of last year.

President Trump hosted tax reform roundtable in Florida:

The White House said Trump held a roundtable Monday with local business owners in the Miami area, joined by Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Labor Secretary Alex Acosta and Small Business Administration head Linda McMahon.

Facing headwinds this fall, Republicans are placing their midterm election hopes on selling the benefits of the law to Americans.

Trump has sometimes chafed at scripted events, deviating from the planned message to discuss whatever is on his mind.

Trump plans to host Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at his Florida club this week.

Categories: Ohio News

Granddaughter: Barbara Bush is 'a fighter,' in good spirits

Channel 10 news - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 09:41

HOUSTON — Former first lady Barbara Bush, who was reported in "failing health" over the weekend, is in "great spirits" and the family is grateful for "everybody's prayers and thoughts," her granddaughter said Monday.

Bush family spokesman Jim McGrath said in a news release Sunday that "Mrs. Bush, now age 92, has decided not to seek additional medical treatment and will instead focus on comfort care" at home in Houston following consultations with her doctors and family.

McGrath did not elaborate on the nature of Bush's health problems but on Monday said she's suffered in recent years from congestive heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. She also has been treated for decades for Graves' disease, which is a thyroid condition, had heart surgery in 2009 for a severe narrowing of her main heart valve and was hospitalized a year before that for surgery on a perforated ulcer.

Jenna Bush Hager, an anchor on NBC's "Today" show, told the program Monday morning that Bush is resting comfortably with family.

"She's a fighter. She's an enforcer," Hager said, using the family's nickname for her grandmother. "We're grateful for her, for everybody's prayers and thoughts, and just know the world is better because she is in it."

"We are grateful for her. She's the best grandma anybody could have ever had ... or have," she said.

Bush is one of only two first ladies who was also the mother of a president. The other was Abigail Adams, wife of John Adams, the nation's second president, and mother of John Quincy Adams, the sixth president.

Bush married George H.W. Bush on Jan. 6, 1945. They had six children and have been married longer than any presidential couple in American history.

Eight years after she and her husband left the White House, Mrs. Bush stood with her husband as their son George W. was sworn in as the 43rd president.

Hager said the former president "still says, 'I love you Barbie' every night," describing their grandparents' close relationship as "remarkable."

McGrath said Bush was concerned more for her family than herself.

"It will not surprise those who know her that Barbara Bush has been a rock in the face of her failing health, worrying not for herself — thanks to her abiding faith — but for others," he said.

President Donald Trump's press secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, said in a statement Sunday evening that "the President's and first lady's prayers are with all of the Bush family during this time."

Bush is known for her white hair and her triple-strand fake pearl necklace.

Her brown hair began to gray in the 1950s, while her 3-year-old daughter Pauline, known to her family as Robin, underwent treatment for leukemia and eventually died in October 1953. She later said dyed hair didn't look good on her and credited the color to the public's perception of her as "everybody's grandmother."

Her pearls sparked a national fashion trend when she wore them to her husband's inauguration in 1989. The pearls became synonymous with Bush, who later said she selected them to hide the wrinkles in her neck. The candid admission only bolstered her common sense and down-to-earth public image.

Her 93-year-old husband, the nation's 41st president who served from 1989 to 1993, also has had health issues in recent years. In April 2017, he was hospitalized in Houston for two weeks for a mild case of pneumonia and chronic bronchitis. He was hospitalized months earlier, also for pneumonia. He has a form of Parkinson's disease and uses a motorized scooter or a wheelchair for mobility.

Before being president, he served as a congressman, CIA director and Ronald Reagan's vice president.

Barbara Pierce Bush was born June 8, 1925, in Rye, New York. Her father was the publisher of McCall's and Redbook magazines. She and George H.W. Bush married when she was 19 and while he was a young naval aviator. After World War II, the Bushes moved to Texas where he went into the oil business.

Along with her memoirs, she's the author of "C. Fred's Story" and "Millie's Book," based on the lives of her dogs. Proceeds from the books benefited adult and family literacy programs. The Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy began during her White House years with the goal of improving the lives of disadvantaged Americans by boosting literacy among parents and their children. The foundation partners with local programs and had awarded more than $40 million as of 2014 to create or expand more than 1,500 literacy programs nationwide.

Categories: Ohio News

Highway patrol identifies 2 who died in small plane crash in Coshocton County

Channel 10 news - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 09:21

The Ohio State Highway Patrol identified the two people killed in a small plane crash in Coshocton County Monday.

According to OSHP, Edward Zezlina, 67, and Linda O'Brien, 71, were in the plane when it crashed. Zezlina was flying the plane. The couple lives in Grafton, Ohio, in Lorain County.

The crash happened in a remote area only accessible by foot or ATV.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the flight left Elyria, Ohio and was headed to DeLand, Florida. The plane was a 1971 Beechcraft Bonanza.

The call came in at about 10 a.m. and the crash is located in the 30700 block of County Road 401.

At about 7:25 a.m., the Coshocton County Sheriff received a call that the plane dropped off the radar. The Sheriff's office and highway patrol confirmed the plane did not land at any surrounding airports and began a search. At about 9:50 a.m., a resident reported finding the wreckage.

The National Transportation Safety Board will determine the cause of the crash after further investigation.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation by authorities including the Federal Aviation Administration and local law enforcement.

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Categories: Ohio News

Concealed carry permits in Franklin County expected to hit record level

Channel 10 news - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 08:33

Local sheriff’s offices say there’s a direct correlation between the topic of gun control and the number of people applying for concealed carry licenses.

“Whether it’s school shootings, terrorism, random acts of violence, nothing seems to motivate people to get a CCW permit more than the discussion of gun control,” says Major Steve Tucker with the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office.

Gun safety has been making headlines ever since the February 14th shooting in Parkland, Florida at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School killed 17 students and staff.

Major Tucker says the movement that soon followed - #NEVERAGAIN – took the discussion of gun control to new heights, which influenced the number of CCW permit applications the sheriff’s office is now experiencing.

“Comparatively, when you look at years past, we’ve seen 6, 7, 10,000 but we’ve never had a year with over 13,000,” Tucker adds.

Another trend often seen with concealed carry permit applications is during a presidential election when the debate over guns rises to the forefront every four years.

In the most recent presidential election in 2016, the Ohio Attorney General’s office issued 117,953 *new* concealed carry licenses. That year also marked the largest number of CCW permits since 2004 when licenses were first issued in the state.

“We see people begin to come into sheriff’s office to apply for CCW applications because people think that there's going to be an overreach on the part of the federal government,” explains Tucker.

Categories: Ohio News

“The Wireman” Press Jones, N8UG, SK:

ARRL News - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 08:30

“The Wireman” Pressley W. “Press” Jones, N8UG, of Landrum, South Carolina, died on April 10. He was 89. The “original” Wireman and his crew have been staples of many hamfests and conventions across the US for more than 45 years, supplying attendees with coaxial cable, wire, insulators, balanced feed line, and more. “He was a great teacher and speaker with his one-of-a kind approach to communica...

Categories: Amateur Radio News

Starbucks CEO hopes to meet with men arrested in Philly shop

Channel 10 news - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 08:09

PHILADELPHIA — The CEO of Starbucks arrived in Philadelphia hoping to meet with two black men who were arrested when the coffee chain's employees called 911 and said they were trespassing. Meanwhile, protesters took over the shop Monday.

"I would like to have a dialogue with them to make sure we have the opportunity to really understand the situation and they can join me in finding a constructive way to solve this issue," Starbucks' CEO Kevin Johnson on ABC's "Good Morning America" on Monday. He called their arrest "reprehensible."

A call seeking comment from the men's lawyer about any possible meeting wasn't immediately returned.

About two dozen chanting protesters took over the Starbucks location Monday to protest the arrests.

"We don't want this Starbucks to make any money today. That's our goal," said Abdul-Aliy Muhammad, one of the protest's organizers and co-founder of the Black and Brown Workers Collective.

Just before 7:30 a.m., the protesters moved inside and stood in front of the counter, some holding banners reading "End Stop and Frisk," chanting slogans like, "A whole lot of racism, a whole lot of crap, Starbucks coffee is anti-black."

Starbucks regional vice president Camille Hymes attempted to talk to the protesters but was shouted down.

Over the weekend, demonstrators called for the firing of the employee who contacted police, who arrested the men on Thursday.

Officials have said police officers were told the men had asked to use the store's restroom but were denied because they hadn't bought anything and they refused to leave.

Police haven't released the names of the men who were arrested and later released after the district attorney's office said there was lack of evidence that a crime had been committed.

Over the weekend Johnson issued a statement saying the company is investigating its practices, working on training and will reach out to outside experts to make any needed changes that would help prevent such an occurrence from happening again.

"Creating an environment that is both safe and welcoming for everyone is paramount for every store," he said in the statement. "Regretfully, our practices and training led to a bad outcome — the basis for the call to the Philadelphia police department was wrong. Our store manager never intended for these men to be arrested and this should never have escalated as it did."

Categories: Ohio News

Foundation to Honor Former ARRL Connecticut Section Manager Betsey Doane, K1EIC

ARRL News - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 07:33

Former Connecticut Section Manager and retired professor Betsey Doane, K1EIC, will receive the Housatonic Community College Foundation (HCCF) Lifetime Achievement Award on April 19, during the college’s 50th anniversary community celebration.

Doane has been on the cutting edge of major industry advancements in teaching techniques for the visually impaired. She has worked toward developing comput...

Categories: Amateur Radio News

7 inmates killed, 17 injured in fights at max security prison

Channel 10 news - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 04:46
COLUMBIA, S.C. - A South Carolina prisons spokesman says 7 inmates are dead and 17 others required outside medical attention after hours of fighting inside a maximum security prison.

Prisons spokesman Jeff Taillon announced the grim outcome after State Law Enforcement Division agents helped secure Lee Correctional Institution around 3 a.m. Monday.

Taillon said multiple inmate fights that broke out at 7:15 p.m. Sunday.

Taillon said no officers were wounded.

The maximum-security facility in Bishopville houses about 1,500 inmates, some of South Carolina's most violent and longest-serving offenders. Two officers were stabbed in a 2015 fight. One inmate killed another in February.
Categories: Ohio News

Question of sales tax on online purchases goes to high court

Channel 10 news - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 04:42

Sales Tax: $0.

Online shoppers have gotten used to seeing that line on checkout screens before they click "purchase." But a case before the Supreme Court could change that.

At issue is a rule stemming from two, decades-old Supreme Court cases: If a business is shipping to a state where it doesn't have an office, warehouse or other physical presence, it doesn't have to collect the state's sales tax.

That means large retailers such as Apple, Macy's, Target and Walmart, which have brick-and-mortar stores nationwide, generally collect sales tax from customers who buy from them online. But other online sellers, from 1-800 Contacts to home goods site Wayfair, can often sidestep charging the tax.

More than 40 states are asking the Supreme Court to reconsider that rule in a case being argued Tuesday. They say they're losing out on "billions of dollars in tax revenue each year, requiring cuts to critical government programs" and that their losses compound as online shopping grows. But small businesses that sell online say the complexity and expense of collecting taxes nationwide could drive them out of business.

Large retailers want all businesses to "be playing by the same set of rules," said Deborah White, the president of the litigation arm of the Retail Industry Leaders Association, which represents more than 70 of America's largest retailers.

For years, the issue of whether out-of-state sellers should collect sales tax had to do mostly with one company: Amazon.com. The online giant is said to account for more than 40 percent of U.S. online retail sales. But as Amazon has grown, dotting the country with warehouses, it has had to charge sales tax in more and more places.

President Donald Trump has slammed the company, accusing it of paying "little or no taxes" to state and local governments. But since 2017, Amazon has been collecting sales tax in every state that charges it. Third-party sellers that use Amazon to sell products make their own tax collection decisions, however.

The case now before the Supreme Court could affect those third-party Amazon sellers and many other sellers that don't collect taxes in all states — sellers such as jewelry website Blue Nile, pet products site Chewy.com, clothing retailer L.L. Bean, electronics retailer Newegg and internet retailer Overstock.com. Sellers on eBay and Etsy, which provide platforms for smaller sellers, also don't collect sales tax nationwide.

States generally require consumers who weren't charged sales tax on a purchase to pay it themselves, often through self-reporting on their income tax returns. But states have found that only about 1 percent to 2 percent actually pay.

States would capture more of that tax if out-of-state sellers had to collect it, and states say software has made sales tax collection simple.

Out-of-state sellers disagree, calling it costly and extraordinarily complex, with tax rates and rules that vary not only by state but also by city and county. For example, in Illinois, Snickers are taxed at a higher rate than Twix because foods containing flour don't count as candy. Sellers say free or inexpensive software isn't accurate, more sophisticated software is expensive and that collecting tax nationwide would also subject them to potentially costly audits.

"For small businesses on tight margins, these costs are going to be fatal in many cases," said Andy Pincus, who filed a brief on behalf of eBay and small businesses that use its platform.

The case now before the Supreme Court involves South Dakota, which has no income tax and relies heavily on sales tax for revenue. South Dakota's governor has said the state loses out on an estimated $50 million a year in sales tax that doesn't get collected by out-of-state sellers.

In 2016 the state passed a law requiring those sellers to collect taxes on sales into the state, a law challenging the Supreme Court precedents. The state, conceding it could win only if the Supreme Court reverses course, has lost in lower courts.

South Dakota says the high court's previous decisions don't reflect today's world. The court first adopted its physical presence rule on sales tax collection in a 1967 case dealing with a catalog retailer. At the time, the court was concerned in part about the burden collecting sales tax would place on the catalog company. The court reaffirmed that ruling in 1992.

It's unclear how the justices might align on the question this time. But three justices — Neil Gorsuch, Clarence Thomas and Anthony Kennedy — have suggested a willingness to rethink those decisions. Kennedy has written that the 1992 case was "questionable even when decided" and "now harms states to a degree far greater than could have been anticipated earlier."

"Although online businesses may not have a physical presence in some states, the Web has, in many ways, brought the average American closer to most major retailers," he wrote in suggesting the days of inconsistent sales tax collection may be numbered. "A connection to a shopper's favorite store is a click away regardless of how close or far the nearest storefront."

Categories: Ohio News

NASA spacecraft aims to put mystery planets on galactic map

Channel 10 news - Mon, 04/16/2018 - 03:49

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Calling all planets that orbit around bright, nearby stars: NASA's new Tess spacecraft is looking to do a head count.

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite — Tess for short — is embarking Monday on a two-year quest to find and identify mystery worlds thought to be lurking in our cosmic backyard. The spacecraft aims to add thousands of exoplanets, or planets beyond our solar system, to the galactic map for future study.

Life might be out there, whether microbial or more advanced, and scientists say Tess and later missions will help answer the age-old question of whether we're alone.

"It is very exciting. ... By human nature, we look for exploration and adventure, and this is an opportunity to see what's next," NASA's Sandra Connelly, a science program director, said Sunday on the eve of launch.

Tess is flying on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, scheduled to blast off at 6:32 p.m. Monday from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

Here's a peek at little Tess and its creators' big ambitions.
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SPACECRAFT: At 5 feet (1.5 meters), Tess is shorter than most adults and downright puny compared with most other spacecraft. The observatory is 4 feet across (1.2 meters), not counting the solar wings, which are folded for launch, and weighs just 800 pounds (362 kilograms). NASA says it's somewhere between the size of a refrigerator and a stacked washer and dryer. Four wide-view cameras are surrounded by a sun shade, to keep stray light out as they monitor any dips in brightness from target stars. Repeated dips would indicate a planet passing in front of its star.

ORBIT: Tess will aim for a unique elongated orbit that passes within 45,000 miles of Earth on one end and as far away as the orbit of the moon on the other end. NASA insists there's no chance of Tess hitting any other satellites or running into the moon, which should never be anywhere close. The lunar gravity will keep the spacecraft stabilized in this orbit for decades to come, with no fuel needed. It will take Tess two weeks to circle Earth.

JOB: Tess will scan almost the entire sky during its $337 million mission, staring at hundreds of thousands, even millions of small, faint red dwarf stars. Scientists expect to discover thousands of planets that, over time, will undergo further scrutiny by powerful telescopes in space and on Earth. That's why NASA, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and and other collaborators are targeting stars within hundreds or, at most, thousands of light-years: It will make the detailed searches yet to come that much easier. NASA's planet-hunting pioneer, the Kepler Space Telescope, has spent the past nine years focusing on considerably fainter, more distant stars and discovered nearly three-quarters of the 3,700-plus exoplanets confirmed to date. With Tess, "our planetary census is going to move in" closer to us, MIT researcher Jenn Burt said Sunday. Satellite maker Orbital ATK's Robert Lockwood said he expects Tess to take exoplanet discovery to a whole new level.

ALIEN LIFE: Tess has no instruments capable of detecting life. Its job is to find and characterize planets that will become the main targets of future telescopes. "By looking at such a large section of the sky, this kind of stellar real estate, we open up the ability to cherry-pick the best stars for doing follow-up science," said Burt. NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, once launched in 2020 or so, will probe these planets' atmospheres for potential traces of life. Giant telescopes still in construction or on the draw zing board also will lend a hand.

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