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Cooperstown's Doubleday Field getting a makeover

North Country Public Radio - Mon, 05/28/2018 - 22:00
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. (AP) Cooperstown's Doubleday Field is ready for a makeover.
Categories: News

Warm weather draws boaters to Buckeye Lake

Channel 10 news - Mon, 05/28/2018 - 20:49

BUCKEYE LAKE, Ohio - The unofficial start of summer is underway at Buckeye Lake.

Boats and jet skis are leaving the docks and kids are fishing on the rocky shores of the water.

“It is close by and kind of like a mini day vacation,” Amy Comisford of Granville said.

For Comisford, Buckeye Lake has been a part of her summers for more than a decade.

“It is really nice, very relaxing and now I’m ready to back to work tomorrow.”

Despite the relaxing water, she said she has noticed some changes in and around the lake following construction on the nearby dam.

“I noticed a lot of the houses around here don’t have their big beautiful trees that they use to.”

Those trees were collateral in the effort by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources to create a walkway along the water.

Another difference at Buckeye Lake is the water levels are higher than this time last year.

For several summers, ODNR kept water levels low to preserve lake infrastructure. Come Memorial Day, some boaters said the water is still too low.

“It’s still dragging the bottom, so we are getting into a lot of mud,” boater Kyle Hall said.

“It needs to be up about another foot.”

According to ODNR, the second phase of the construction of the new dam is expected to be completed by the end of this year.

Categories: Ohio News

One person injured after shots fired at South Linden park

Channel 10 news - Mon, 05/28/2018 - 20:32

COLUMBUS, Ohio – One person was taken to the hospital after he was shot in the leg at a South Linden park, according to Columbus police.

Police said officers were called to Maloney Park on Joyce Avenue around 6 p.m. Monday.

A witness told police two groups were shooting at each other then they left the park.

The person who was shot, 23-year-old Que’vontae Price, went to a gas station on Cleveland Avenue near East 23rd Avenue, according to police.

From there, police said Price was taken to a local hospital where he is expected to recover from his injury.

Police estimate between 50 and 100 people were at the park at the time of the shooting.

If anyone has any information, police ask they call detectives at 614-645-0114 or Central Ohio Crime Stoppers at 614-461-8477.

Categories: Ohio News

TV anchor, photojournalist killed when tree falls on vehicle

Channel 10 news - Mon, 05/28/2018 - 19:02

TRYON, N.C. (AP) — A TV news anchor and a photojournalist were killed Monday when a tree fell on their vehicle in North Carolina as they reported on flooding and severe weather associated with Subtropical Storm Alberto, the television station said.

WYFF-TV Anchor Mike McCormick and photojournalist Aaron Smeltzer both worked in the Greenville, South Carolina, market for more than a decade, anchor Carol Goldsmith said on air, breaking the news.

"Mike and Aaron were beloved members of our team — our family," Goldsmith said.

The men were driving on U.S. Highway 176 near Tryon when the large tree fell on their vehicle, North Carolina Highway Patrol Master Trooper Murico Stephens said.

McCormick and Smeltzer had just interviewed Tryon Fire Chief Geoffrey Tennant. They told Tennant to be careful with Alberto's remnant expected to bring more heavy rains and mudslides this week. He told them to be careful too.

"Ten minutes later we get the call and it was them," Tennant said at a news conference, his voice cracking.

A woman died in a mudslide on May 19 not far from the wreck and officials in Polk County were asking people living in vulnerable areas to voluntary leave before the weather got worse.

Neither Stephens nor Tennant directly blamed the up to 2 inches (5 centimeters) of rain that fell Monday from the fringes of Alberto for the deaths. The fire chief said the roots of the 3-foot (91-centimeter) diameter tree were loosened in ground saturated by a week's worth of rain.

The TV vehicle engine's was still running and the transmission was in drive when crews found it. The men died instantly, said Tennant, who called the deaths a "freak of nature."

McCormick was a weekend anchor for the Greenville station and covered Spartanburg and surrounding areas. He came to the station in April 2007.

Smeltzer worked in Greenville for more than a decade, coming to WYFF-TV from a different station in the market. He touted on his Twitter biography of winning four Emmys.

WHNS-TV reporter Derek Dellinger competed with McCormick and Smeltzer, but also considered them friends. He called Smeltzer a perfectionist and McCormick a hard worker and a nice guy.

"Despite being the competition, I had interactions with (McCormick) both in and out of work, and we would talk about work issues, talk about life — everything, because we were in such a similar position at our respective stations," Dellinger said, calling him "a good guy" with a warm heart.

Categories: Ohio News

Power outage strands riders at Cedar Point

Channel 10 news - Mon, 05/28/2018 - 13:15

A power outage at an amusement park in Ohio has left riders stranded on some of its roller coasters and other rides for about two hours.

A spokesman for Cedar Point in Sandusky says the park lost power Monday afternoon when a car hit a utility pole.

Photos shared on social media by people at the park along Lake Erie show riders stuck on a train going up the 300-foot-tall Millennium Force roller coaster. Park employees were helping people off of the rides.

Crews were able to restore power within about two hours.

Categories: Ohio News

FBI: Kindly Reboot Your Router Now, Please

Krebs on Security - Mon, 05/28/2018 - 12:54

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is warning that a new malware threat has rapidly infected more than a half-million consumer devices. To help arrest the spread of the malware, the FBI and security firms are urging home Internet users to reboot routers and network-attached storage devices made by a range of technology manufacturers.

The growing menace — dubbed VPNFilter — targets Linksys, MikroTik, NETGEAR and TP-Link networking equipment in the small and home office space, as well as QNAP network-attached storage (NAS) devices, according to researchers at Cisco.

Experts are still trying to learn all that VPNFilter is built to do, but for now they know it can do two things well: Steal Web site credentials; and issue a self-destruct command, effectively rendering infected devices inoperable for most consumers.

Cisco researchers said they’re not yet sure how these 500,000 devices were infected with VPNFilter, but that most of the targeted devices have known public exploits or default credentials that make compromising them relatively straightforward.

“All of this has contributed to the quiet growth of this threat since at least 2016,” the company wrote on its Talos Intelligence blog.

The Justice Department said last week that VPNFilter is the handiwork of “APT28,” the security industry code name for a group of Russian state-sponsored hackers also known as “Fancy Bear” and the “Sofacy Group.” This is the same group accused of conducting election meddling attacks during the 2016 U.S. presidential race.

“Foreign cyber actors have compromised hundreds of thousands of home and office routers and other networked devices worldwide,” the FBI said in a warning posted to the Web site of the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3). “The actors used VPNFilter malware to target small office and home office routers. The malware is able to perform multiple functions, including possible information collection, device exploitation, and blocking network traffic.”

According to Cisco, here’s a list of the known affected devices:

LINKSYS DEVICES:

E1200
E2500
WRVS4400N

MIKROTIK ROUTEROS VERSIONS FOR CLOUD CORE ROUTERS:

1016
1036
1072

NETGEAR DEVICES:

DGN2200
R6400
R7000
R8000
WNR1000
WNR2000

QNAP DEVICES:

TS251
TS439 Pro

Other QNAP NAS devices running QTS software

TP-LINK DEVICES:

R600VPN

Image: Cisco

Unfortunately, there is no easy way to tell if your device is infected. If you own one of these devices and it is connected to the Internet, you should reboot (or unplug, wait a few seconds, replug) the device now. This should wipe part of the infection, if there is one. But you’re not out of the woods yet.

Cisco said part of the code used by VPNFilter can still persist until the affected device is reset to its factory-default settings. Most modems and DVRs will have a tiny, recessed button that can only be pressed with something small and pointy, such as a paper clip. Hold this button down for at least 10 seconds (some devices require longer) with the device powered on, and that should be enough to reset the device back to its factory-default settings. In some cases, you may need to hold the tiny button down and keep it down while you plug in the power cord, and then hold it for 30 seconds.

After resetting the device, you’ll need to log in to its administrative page using a Web browser. The administrative page of most commercial routers can be accessed by typing 192.168.1.1, or 192.168.0.1 into a Web browser address bar. If neither of those work, try looking up the documentation at the router maker’s site, or checking to see if the address is listed here. If you still can’t find it, open the command prompt (Start > Run/or Search for “cmd”) and then enter ipconfig. The address you need should be next to Default Gateway under your Local Area Connection.

Once you’re there, make sure you’ve changed the factory-default password that allows you to log in to the device (pick something strong that you can remember).

You’ll also want to make sure your device has the latest firmware updates. Most router Web interfaces have a link or button you click to check for newer device firmware. If there are any updates available, install those before doing anything else.

If you’ve reset the router’s settings, you’ll also want to encrypt your connection if you’re using a wireless router (one that broadcasts your modem’s Internet connection so that it can be accessed via wireless devices, like tablets and smart phones). WPA2 is the strongest encryption technology available in most modern routers, followed by WPA and WEP (the latter is fairly trivial to crack with open source tools, so don’t use it unless it’s your only option).

But even users who have a strong router password and have protected their wireless Internet connection with a strong WPA2 passphrase may have the security of their routers undermined by security flaws built into these routers. At issue is a technology called “Wi-Fi Protected Setup” (WPS) that ships with many routers marketed to consumers and small businesses. According to the Wi-Fi Alliance, an industry group, WPS is “designed to ease the task of setting up and configuring security on wireless local area networks. WPS enables typical users who possess little understanding of traditional Wi-Fi configuration and security settings to automatically configure new wireless networks, add new devices and enable security.”

However, WPS also may expose routers to easy compromise. Read more about this vulnerability here. If your router is among those listed as using WPS, see if you can disable WPS from the router’s administration page. If you’re not sure whether it can be, or if you’d like to see whether your router maker has shipped an update to fix the WPS problem on their hardware, check this spreadsheet.

Turning off any remote administration features that may be turned on by default is always a good idea, as is disabling Universal Plug and Play (UPnP), which can easily poke holes in your firewall without you knowing it). However, Cisco researchers say there is no indication that VPNFilter uses UPnP.

For more tips on how to live with your various Internet of Things (IoT) devices without becoming a nuisance to yourself or the Internet at large, please see Some Basic Rules for Securing Your IoT Stuff.

Categories: Technology, Virus Info

Is cockroach milk back as a superfood trend?

Channel 10 news - Mon, 05/28/2018 - 11:01

Food trends like cronuts and charcoal come and go, but one bizarre "superfood" is back, two years after it first debuted: Cockroach milk.

The pesky bug is actually filled with an energy-rich milk-like substance. It's not your typical non-dairy milk alternative like almond milk, but cockroach milk is gaining popularity once again, after coming to the forefront in 2016.

In 2016, a research team based at the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine in India said the "milk" from the Pacific beetle cockroach could make for the next great superfood. These cockroaches possess protein-rich crystals that lactate to feed their young.

This particular type of cockroach, which is usually found on Pacific islands like Hawaii, gives birth to their babies, as opposed to laying eggs. Their "milk" is made up of protein-infused crystals reported to have three times the energy of the equivalent mass of normal dairy milk.

"The crystals are like a complete food -- they have proteins, fats and sugars. If you look into the protein sequences, they have all the essential amino acids," Sanchari Banerjee, one of the main researchers, told the Times of India.

Perhaps now that it's 2018, people are more daring and willing to try this somewhat baffling milk alternative. Some companies are trying to get ahead of the trend by selling the bug juice in everything from milk to ice cream, WCBS reports. South African company Gourmet Grubb is selling what they call "Entomilk" -- a milk that comes from sustainably farmed insects.

"Think of Entomilk as a sustainable, nature-friendly, nutritious, lactose free, delicious, guilt-free dairy alternative of the future," the company says on its website. Gourmet Grubb says Entomilk has a high protein content and is rich in iron, zinc, and calcium.

Some scientists and cockroach milk producers admit that it may be hard to get people on the bandwagon, but that's not the only road block for cockroach milk. Besides for its unappealing name, cockroach milk is hard to come by. Roaches aren't the easiest creatures to milk, NPR reports.

It's also still unclear if cockroach milk is safe to consume. "We have no evidence that it is actually safe for human consumption," Subramanian Ramaswamy, the lead author of the study, said 2016.

So, even though some companies are developing the milk alternative now, there are many questions that have to be answered before it becomes a world wide trend.

Categories: Ohio News

Parkland parents decry game that simulates school shootings

Channel 10 news - Mon, 05/28/2018 - 10:54

MIAMI — An upcoming computer video game that would let players re-create school shootings by stalking school hallways and racking up kills has been condemned as insensitive and inappropriate by the parents of students who were killed during the school massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High.

The game is titled "Active Shooter" and slated for a June 6 release. It's branded as a "SWAT simulator" that lets players choose between being an active shooter terrorizing a school or the responding SWAT team. It was published by the company Acid.

The Miami Herald reports Acid said in a blog post that its game doesn't promote violence and that it might remove the shooter's role.

Ryan Petty, the father of a student killed during the Feb. 14 massacre, called for the release to be canceled.

Categories: Ohio News

High school bans valedictorian's speech, so he uses a megaphone

Channel 10 news - Mon, 05/28/2018 - 10:22

Christian Bales, the valedictorian of Holy Cross High School in Crestview Hills, Kentucky, was barred from delivering his graduation speech on Friday. Instead, he delivered it after the graduation ceremony, outside of the school on a megaphone.

After reading a copy of Bales' speech, the school determined it was "political and inconsistent with the teachings of the Catholic church." Bales said he found out the day of graduation that the Diocese of Covington cut his speech from the ceremony.

"The diocese took ours and said they were too confrontational, too angry, too personal, and that they weren't appropriate for the setting," Bales said after both he and his friend's speeches were cut.

Bales repeated the phrase "the young people will win" in his speech, a phrase coined by Parkland, Florida, students who survived a mass shooting earlier this year.

In a statement, a diocese spokesperson said:

"School officials and representatives of the Diocese of Covington reserve the right to review and approve all student speeches to be presented in public at high school graduations. The student speeches for the Holy Cross High School graduation were not submitted for review before the deadline. They were found to contain elements that were political and inconsistent with the teachings of the Catholic church."

"I know they pointed out that the Parkland teens teach ideologies that apparently go against the Catholic faith, which I don't agree with in my experience," Bales said, according to WKRC.

Bales' mother, Gillian Marksberry, believes there was another reason the school did not want her son to speak.

Marksberry said she received a call from the school's principal last week. She said he wanted her help to ensure Bales wore men's clothing to graduation and did not wear makeup or bobby pins in his hair.

"That was disturbing because, in four years, I had never received a phone call from the principal," Marksberry said. "No one ever reached out to me to help learn about my child."

Bales is openly gay. He says to date, the school had been supportive.

This incident won't silence him, he says. "I think I'm going to keep fighting for what I believe in," Bales said. "I'm going to keep using my megaphone and intensifying my voice."

Bales' mother planned to send his 9-year-old sister to Holy Cross in the future but said after Friday night, that is not happening.

Categories: Ohio News

Lava covers plugged well at Hawaii geothermal plant property

Channel 10 news - Mon, 05/28/2018 - 10:17

HONOLULU — Lava from the Kilauea volcano covered at least one well Sunday at a geothermal power plant on the Big Island, according to a Hawaii County Civil Defense report.

The well was successfully plugged in anticipation of the lava flow, and a second well 100 feet away has also been secured, according to the report. The plugs protect against the release of gas that could turn toxic when mixed with lava.

The lava breached the property overnight. David Mace, a spokesman for the Federal Emergency Management Agency, said the flow started about 200 yards away from the nearest well. But he said safety precautions went into effect before the breach.

"I think it's safe to say authorities have been concerned about the flow of lava onto the plant property since the eruption started," he said.

Puna Geothermal, owned by Nevada's Ormat Technologies, was shut down shortly after Kilauea began spewing lava on May 3. The plant harnesses heat and steam from the Earth's core to spin turbines to generate power. A flammable gas called pentane is used as part of the process, though officials earlier this month removed 50,000 gallons (189,265 liters) of the gas from the plant to reduce the chance of explosions. They also capped the 11 wells at the property to try to prevent a breach.

Before the lava reached the well, plant spokesman Mike Kaleikini told the news agency Hawaii News Now that there was no indication of the release of the poisonous gas hydrogen sulfide — the greatest fear should lava hit the wells.

"As long as conditions are safe, we will have personnel on site," Kaleikini said. "Primary concern is sulfur dioxide from the eruption and lava coming on site. We monitor for hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide on a continuous basis."

Steve Brantley of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said the flow seemed to have halted Sunday morning before it picked back up and covered the well at the plant, which lies on the southeast flank of the volcano, nestled between residential neighborhoods.

Lava-filled fissures have torn apart chunks of the southeastern side of the Big Island over the past three weeks as Kilaeau has become more active.

Categories: Ohio News

John Glenn's 'Project Bullet' helmet up for auction

Channel 10 news - Mon, 05/28/2018 - 10:06

COLUMBUS, Ohio — The helmet John Glenn wore during his history-making transcontinental flight is being sold.

The late astronaut and U.S senator made the first supersonic transcontinental flight on July 16, 1957. He sped in his Vought F8U Crusader from near Los Angeles to Brooklyn in a record-setting 3 hours, 23 minutes and 8.4 seconds.

Glenn dubbed the mission "Project Bullet," because he flew faster than a bullet from a .45-caliber pistol. The fame the young airman from Ohio gained from the record-setting flight helped land him a spot in NASA's Mercury program.

The U.S. Navy helmet he wore on the flight will be auctioned by Nate D. Sanders Auctions Thursday. It's gold with "J.H. Glenn" penned on the right side. Bidding will begin at $100,000.

Glenn died in 2016.

Categories: Ohio News

Longtime CBS radio correspondent Bob Fuss dies at age 64

Channel 10 news - Mon, 05/28/2018 - 09:46

FALLS CHURCH, Va. (AP) — Longtime CBS radio reporter Bob Fuss has died. He was 64.

A close friend, Peter Maer, sent a note to Fuss' colleagues saying the network's Capitol Hill correspondent died Sunday from a rare form of leukemia.

Fuss covered every presidential election from 1980 to 2012 for CBS Radio, but also was a fixture on the entertainment beat, covering 15 straight Academy Awards ceremonies.

Fuss graduated from Stanford University at age 19 and got his big break covering the Patty Hearst kidnapping as a radio freelancer.

Birth defects left Fuss walking with crutches, but he still skied and snorkeled. It even led to the title of Fuss' memoir, "Kidnapped by Nuns," after a group of well-meaning nuns mistakenly herded him into a group of disabled people waiting for the Pope's blessing.

Categories: Ohio News

Fred Rogers, our friend and neighbor

Channel 10 news - Mon, 05/28/2018 - 09:35

It's been 50 years since "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood" first went on the air – a television program for young children that treated them with respect, and helped them understand a complicated, often challenging world. Faith Salie looks back on the exceptional Fred Rogers, talking with his family and collaborators, and with filmmaker Morgan Neville, director of a new documentary, "Won't You Be My Neighbor."

Categories: Ohio News

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