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2018-04-14 PROGRESS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 23:34
Date: Saturday Apr 14, 2018
Time: 9:05 PM
Duration: less than 1 minute
Maximum Elevation: 10°
Approach: 10° above WSW
Departure: 10° above SW

1 person is dead after NE Columbus shooting

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 21:43

COLUMBUS, Ohio - One person is dead after a shooting in northeast Columbus Friday night, according to police.

Police said officers responded to the 4700 block of Larkhall Lane around 11:05 p.m.

The person died at Grant Medical Center almost an hour later.

Investigators say the suspect left the crime scene and was wearing all black.

Categories: Ohio News

Trump: U.S., allies strike Syria to stop chemical weapons

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 21:42

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States, France and Britain launched military strikes in Syria to punish President Bashar Assad for an apparent chemical attack against civilians and to deter him from doing it again, President Donald Trump announced Friday. Pentagon officials said the attacks targeted the heart of Assad's programs to develop and produce chemical weapons.

Explosions lit up the skies over Damascus, the Syrian capital, as Trump spoke from the White House.

Syrian television reported that Syria's air defenses, which are substantial, responded to the attack. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis said there were no reports of U.S. losses in what he described as a heavy but carefully limited assault.

Trump said the U.S. is prepared to sustain economic, diplomatic and military pressure on Assad until he ends what the president called a criminal pattern of killing his own people with internationally banned chemical weapons.

"The evil and the despicable attack left mothers and fathers, infants and children, thrashing in pain and gasping for air. These are not the actions of a man; they are crimes of a monster instead," Trump said.

Mattis, however, said the assault was a "one-time shot," so long as Assad does not repeat his use of chemical weapons.

The strikes were carried out by manned aircraft and from ships that launched cruise missiles from the Mediterranean Sea.

Mattis disclosed that the U.S. had not yet confirmed that the most recent suspected Syrian chemical weapons attack, on April 7 in the Damascus suburb of Douma, included the use of sarin gas. He said at least one chemical was used — chlorine, which also has legitimate industrial uses and had not previously triggered a U.S. military response.

Mattis said the targets selected by U.S., British and French officials were meant to minimize civilian casualties.

"This is difficult to do in a situation like this," he said, in light of the volatility of chemical agents.

At a Pentagon news conference alongside Mattis, and with British and French military officers beside them to emphasize allied unity, Gen. Joseph Dunford said the attacks targeted mainly three targets in western Syria.

Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said missiles first struck a scientific research center in the Damascus area that he said was a center of Syrian research, development, production and testing of chemical and biological warfare technology. The second target was a chemical weapons storage facility west of Homs. He said this was believed to be the main site of Syrian sarin and precursor chemical production equipment.

The third target was a chemical weapons equipment storage facility and an important command post, also west of Homs, Dunford said.

British Prime Minister Theresa May said in London that the West had tried "every possible" diplomatic means to stop Assad from using chemical weapons. "But our efforts have been repeatedly thwarted" by Syria and Russia, she said.

"So there is no practicable alternative to the use of force to degrade and deter the use of chemical weapons by the Syrian regime," May said. "This is not about intervening in a civil war. It is not about regime change."

French President Emmanuel Macron said in a statement that a target of the strike was the Syrian government's "clandestine chemical arsenal."

The Syrian government has repeatedly denied any use of banned weapons.

The decision to strike, after days of deliberations, marked Trump's second order to attack Syria. He authorized a barrage of Tomahawk cruise missiles to hit a single Syrian airfield in April 2017 in retaliation for Assad's use of sarin gas against civilians.

Mattis estimated the latest air campaign was about twice the size of the 2017 strike. He added that the U.S. expects the Syrian government and its allies to conduct a "significant disinformation campaign," which the Pentagon would rebut with additional information Saturday morning.

The air campaign could frustrate those in Trump's base who oppose military intervention and are wary of open-ended conflicts.

Trump chastised Syria's two main allies, Russia and Iran, for their roles in supporting "murderous dictators," and noted that Russian President Vladimir Putin had guaranteed a 2013 international agreement for Assad to get rid of all of his chemical weapons. He called on Moscow to change course and join the West in seeking a more responsible regime in Damascus.

"Russia must decide if it will continue down this dark path, or if it will join with civilized nations as a force for stability and peace," Trump said. "Hopefully, someday we'll get along with Russia, and maybe even Iran — but maybe not."

The U.S. missile strike a year ago, which targeted the airfield from which Syrian aircraft had launched their gas attack, was meant to deter Assad from further use of chemical weapons. Since that did not work, a more intense attack would aim to degrade his ability to carry out further such attacks, and would try to do this by hitting Syrian aircraft, military depots and chemical facilities, among other things.

The strikes that hit early Saturday in Syria came hours before inspectors from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons were set to arrive to inspect the site of the apparent attack.

A broader question is whether the allied attacks are part of a revamped, coherent political strategy to end the war on terms that do not leave Assad in power.

The strikes appear to signal Trump's willingness to draw the United States more deeply into the Syrian conflict. Just weeks ago, Trump said he wanted to end U.S. involvement in Syria and bring American troops home to focus on the homeland. The participation of British and French forces enables Trump to assert a wider international commitment against the use of chemical weapons, but the multi-pronged attack carries the risk of Russian retaliation.

Dunford said the U.S. did not coordinate targets with or notify the Russian government of the strikes, beyond normal airspace "de-confliction" communications.

In his nationwide address, Trump stressed that he has no interest in a longtime fight with Syria.

"As other nations step up their contributions, we look forward to the day when we can bring our warriors home," Trump said. "And great warriors they are."

The U.S. has about 2,000 troops on the ground in Syria as advisers to a makeshift group of anti-Islamic State fighters known as the Syrian Democratic Forces. They are in eastern Syria, far from Damascus. A U.S.-led coalition has been conducting airstrikes in Syria since September 2014 as part of a largely successful effort to break the IS grip on both Syria and Iraq.

Jarrod Agen, Vice President Mike Pence's deputy chief of staff, said Pence called congressional leaders from his hotel suite in Lima, Peru, to notify them of the president's plan to address the nation about the Syrian air strikes.

Categories: Ohio News

Landry signs $75 million contract extension with Browns

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 20:57

CLEVELAND (AP) — Before throwing Jarvis Landry a pass, the Browns made a huge commitment to him.

Cleveland signed the star wide receiver to a five-year, $75 million contract extension on Friday night, locking up a game-changing player they're counting on for the future.

A three-time Pro Bowler acquired last month in a trade with Miami, Landry was at the team's headquarters Friday as the Browns continued preparations for an NFL draft that may re-shape their franchise.

"Jarvis Landry is the type of football player we want on this team for a long time," general manager John Dorsey said. "Obviously, he's an accomplished playmaker, that's why we went after him in the trade but in his short time as a Brown we can already see the type of leadership and competitiveness he's going to bring to his teammates. We are very pleased that we've been able to secure him to a long-term contract."

Landry led the NFL with 112 catches last season and scored nine touchdowns, two more than Cleveland's entire receiving corps.

The 25-year-old will make an immediate impact for a Cleveland team that lost all 16 games last season and is 1-31 in two years under coach Hue Jackson.

"I've always dreamed of two things: taking care of my family and playing football," Landry said. "I've become a product of hard work, sacrifice, persistence, and mental toughness. Jerry Rice said the thing that made him so great was the fear of failure. I've been afraid of failure my whole life. I've endured my share, but in each and every discomforting time I've failed, I've also grown, I've also learned, I've also found success."

The Browns have the No. 1 and No. 4 overall picks and are expected to select a quarterback. However, that pick is likely to spend at least one season backing up newly acquired QB Tyrod Taylor, who will have Landry as a target.

Categories: Ohio News

Police say missing boy has been found safe

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 20:12

COLUMBUS, Ohio - The Columbus Division of Police said an 8-year-old boy reported missing on Friday is safe.

Police said Noah Leake was found with a family member and has returned home.

Categories: Ohio News

Live Updates: U.S. launches military strike on Syria in response to chemical attack

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 18:55

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on U.S.-led missile strikes on Syria (all times local):

11 p.m.

Congressional leaders are supporting President Donald Trump's decision to launch airstrikes against Syrian President Bashar Assad in retaliation for an apparent chemical attack against civilians — although there are some reservations.

House Speaker Paul Ryan is praising Trump's "decisive action in coordination with our allies," adding, "We are united in our resolve."

Senate Armed Service Committee Chairman John McCain is applauding the airstrikes but says "they alone will not achieve U.S. objectives in the Middle East."

Top Senate Democrat Chuck Schumer is calling the airstrikes "appropriate," but says "the administration has to be careful about not getting us into a greater and more involved war in Syria."

And House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says, "One night of airstrikes is not a substitute for a clear, comprehensive Syria strategy."

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10:50 p.m.

Syrian TV is reporting that the attack on Syria targeted a scientific research center in Barzeh, near Damascus.

The report says Syria's air defenses confronted the missiles near Homs, and says the airstrikes also targeted an army depot there.

U.S. President Donald Trump announced the airstrikes in retaliation for Syrian President Bashar Assad's alleged use of chemical weapons.

Syrian air defenses responded to the joint strikes by the United States, France and Britain

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10:35 p.m.

A highly placed Russian politician is likening President Donald Trump to Adolf Hitler after the launch of airstrikes against Syria, and says he regards the action as a move against Russia.

Alexander Sherin, deputy head of the State Duma's defense committee, says Trump "can be called Adolf Hitler No. 2 of our time — because, you see, he even chose the time that Hitler attacked the Soviet Union."

That's according to state news agency RIA-Novosti. The Nazi forces' opening attack against the USSR in 1941 was launched around 4 a.m.

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10:20 p.m.

The British defense ministry says "initial indications" show that the airstrikes against Syria produced a "successful attack" on a Syrian military facility.

The U.K., U.S. and France launched the attacks near Damascus early Saturday. The U.K. ministry says in a statement that while the effectiveness of the strike is still being analyzed, "initial indications are that the precision of the Storm Shadow weapons and meticulous target planning have resulted in a successful attack."

British Prime Minister Theresa May is describing the attack as neither "about intervening in a civil war" nor "about regime change," but a limited and targeted strike that "does not further escalate tensions in the region" and does everything possible to prevent civilian casualties.

May says, "We would have preferred an alternative path. But on this occasion there is none."

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10:17 p.m.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis says he is "absolutely confident" that Syrian President Bashar Assad is behind the alleged chemical attack on his people that the U.S. and allies retaliated against Friday night.

Mattis tells reporters he is certain Assad conducted a chemical attack on innocent people.

He says the U.S. is "very much aware of one of the chemical agents used." And he says there may have been a second.

President Donald Trump announced Friday that the U.S., France and Britain had launched military strikes against Syria to punish Assad for his alleged use of chemical weapons and to deter him from doing it again.

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10:10 p.m.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis says military strikes in Syria are "directed at the Syrian regime" and they have "gone to great lengths to avoid civilians and foreign casualties."

Mattis spoke Friday night after President Donald Trump announced that the U.S., France and Britain launched military strikes on Syria to punish President Bashar Assad for his alleged use of chemical weapons against civilians and to deter him from doing it again.

Mattis is asking that "responsible nations" join in condemning the Assad regime.

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10 p.m.

Defense Secretary James Mattis says the U.S. and its allies have taken "decisive action" against Syrian chemical weapons infrastructure.

Mattis briefed reporters at the Pentagon Friday an hour after President Donald Trump announced the strike.

Mattis says the United States, along with France and the United Kingdom, struck because Syrian President Bashar Assad "did not get the message" when the U.S. launched airstrikes after a chemical attack in 2017.

The defense secretary says Friday's strikes have "sent a clear message" to Assad and his "murderous lieutenants."

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9:50 p.m.

Explosions are being heard to the east, west and south of Damascus as the U.S., U.K. and France conduct airstrikes in retaliation for an alleged chemical attack by the Syrian government on its own people.

Witnesses saw blasts surrounding much of the Syrian capital and a huge fire could be seen from a distance to the east. An AP reporter in Damascus says the attacks turned the sky orange. Syrian television reported that a scientific research center had been hit.

Syrian media reported that Syrian defenses hit 13 rockets south of Damascus. After the attack ceased and the early morning skies went dark once more, vehicles with loudspeakers roamed the streets of Damascus blaring nationalist songs.

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9:40 p.m.

French President Emmanuel Macron says his nation, the United States and Britain have launched a military operation against the Syrian government's "clandestine chemical arsenal."

Macron says in a statement Saturday that France's "red line has been crossed" after a suspected chemical attack last week in the Syrian town of Douma.

He says there is "no doubt" that the Syrian government is responsible. President Bashar Assad's government denies responsibility.

Macron says the operation is limited to Syria's abilities to produce chemical weapons. He is not giving details about what equipment is involved in the operation or what sites it is targeting.

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9:25 p.m.

President Donald Trump is reiterating his call to have other nations take on more of the burden in Syria.

Trump says he has asked U.S. partners "to take greater responsibility for securing their home region, including contributing large amounts of money for the resources, equipment and all of the anti-ISIS effort."

He says increased engagement from countries including Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar and Egypt can ensure that Iran does not profit from the defeat of the Islamic State group.

He adds that, "America does not seek an indefinite presence in Syria — under no circumstances" and says that, "As other nations step up our contributions, we look forward to the day when we can bring our warriors home."

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9:20 p.m.

Syria's capital has been rocked by loud explosions that lit up the sky with heavy smoke as U.S. President Donald Trump announced airstrikes in retaliation for the country's alleged use of chemical weapons.

Associated Press reporters in Damascus saw smoke rising from east Damascus early Saturday morning local time. Syrian state TV says the attack has begun on the capital, though it wasn't immediately clear what was targeted.

Trump announced Friday night that the U.S., France and Britain have launched military strikes in Syria to punish President Bashar Assad for his alleged use of chemical weapons against civilians and to deter him from doing it again.

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9:15 p.m.

President Donald Trump is warning Russia and Iran about their association with Syrian strongman Bashar al-Assad's government, as he announces the launch of retaliatory strikes after an apparent chemical weapons attack last week.

Speaking from the White House, Trump says, "To Iran and to Russia, I ask: What kind of a nation wants to be associated with the mass murder of innocent men, women and children?"

Trump calls the two countries those "most responsible for supporting, equipping and financing the criminal Assad regime."

Trump says, "The nations of the world can be judged by the friends they keep."

He adds ominously, "Hopefully someday we'll get along with Russia, and maybe even Iran, but maybe not."

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9:10 p.m.

President Donald Trump is asking for a "prayer for our noble warriors" as he concludes his remarks announcing strikes on targets associated with the Syrian chemical weapons program.

Trump announced the strikes, in coordination with France and Britain, from the White House Friday night. He said the three nations have "marshaled their righteous power."

Trump is also offering prayers for the Middle East and for the United States.

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9:05 p.m.

President Donald Trump says he is "prepared to sustain" strikes against Syria until the use of chemical agents stops.

The United States, along with assurance from France and the United Kingdom, launched a response Friday against the regime of Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad days after his government allegedly used chemical weapons on its citizens.

But Trump says America does not seek "an indefinite presence" in Syria and will look to pull out its troops once the Islamic State is totally defeated.

Trump has signaled in recent weeks that, despite advice from his national security team, he wanted to accelerate the timetable of the withdrawal of American forces.

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9 p.m.

President Donald Trump says the United States has "launched precision strikes" on targets associated with Syrian chemical weapons program.

Trump spoke from the White House Friday night. He says a "combined operation" with France and the United Kingdom is underway.

Trump says that last Saturday, Syrian President Bashar Assad deployed chemical weapons in what was a "significant escalation in a pattern of chemical weapons use by that very terrible regime."

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8:55 p.m.

President Donald Trump is set to address the nation Friday night amid anticipation of a retaliatory strike for an apparent Syrian chemical weapon attack last week.

That's according to a source familiar with the president's plans, who was not authorized to speak publicly.

Trump has said he will hold the Syrian government, as well as its Russian and Iranian allies, accountable for the suspected attack.

White House spokesman Raj Shah said Friday afternoon that Trump "is going to hold the Syrian government accountable. He's also going to hold the Russians and the Iranians who are propping up this regime responsible."

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5 p.m.

The U.S. Navy was moving an additional Tomahawk missile-armed ship within striking range of Syria as President Donald Trump and his national security aides mulled the scope and timing of an expected military assault in retaliation for a suspected poison gas attack.

Trump's U.N. ambassador, Nikki Haley, said the president had not yet made a final decision, two days after he tweeted that Russia should "get ready" because a missile attack "will be coming" at Moscow's chief Middle East ally.

The presence of Russian troops and air defenses in Syria were among numerous complications weighing on Trump, who must also consider the dangers to roughly 2,000 American troops in the country if Russia were to retaliate for U.S. strikes.

Categories: Ohio News

FBI probing Cohen's "personal business dealings"

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 17:21

Federal prosecutors revealed Friday that their probe of President Donald Trump's personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, involved suspected fraud and the attorney's personal business dealings, and was going on long enough that investigators had already covertly obtained his emails.

The details in court papers came as lawyers for Cohen and Trump sought to block the Justice Department from examining records and electronic devices, including two cell phones, seized by the FBI on Monday from Cohen's residences, office and safety deposit box.

The raids enraged Trump, who called them an "attack on the country." He sent his own lawyer to a hastily arranged hearing before a federal judge in Manhattan to argue that some of the records and communications seized were confidential attorney-client communications and off-limits to investigators.

Prosecutors blacked out sections of their legal memo in which they described what laws they believe Cohen has broken, but the document provided new clues about an investigation that the U.S. Attorney's office in Manhattan had previously declined to confirm existed.

"Although Cohen is an attorney, he also has several other business interests and sources of income. The searches are the result of a months-long investigation into Cohen, and seek evidence of crimes, many of which have nothing to do with his work as an attorney, but rather relate to Cohen's own business dealings," said the filing, signed by Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas McKay.

Prosecutors said they took the unusual step of raiding Cohen's residence and home, rather than requesting records by subpoena, because what they had learned so far led them to distrust he'd turn over what they had asked for.

"Absent a search warrant, these records could have been deleted without record, and without recourse," prosecutors wrote.

The document was filed publicly after lawyers for Cohen appeared before U.S. District Judge Kimba M. Wood to ask that they — not Justice Department lawyers — be given the first crack at reviewing the seized evidence to see whether it was relevant to the investigation or could be forwarded to criminal investigators without jeopardizing attorney-client privilege.

Trump attorney Joanna Hendon told the judge that the president has "an acute interest in these proceedings and the manner in which these materials are reviewed."

"He is the president of the United States," she said. "This is of most concern to him. I think the public is a close second. And anyone who has ever hired a lawyer a close third."

McKay told the judge that he believed the proceedings were an attempt to delay the processing of seized material.

"His attorney-client privilege is no greater than any other person who seeks legal advice," he told Wood.

Cohen's lawyer, Todd Harrison, told the judge: "We think we deserve to know some more of the facts about the underlying investigation in order to rebut their arguments. That's only fair."

Cohen wasn't present for the hearing. Wood, who didn't immediately rule, ordered him to appear in person at another court hearing Monday on the issue to help answer questions about his law practice.

In forceful language, prosecutors struck back at claims by Trump and others that the Monday raids violated the attorney-client privilege between Trump and Cohen, or amounted to an improper extension of the work of Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

As part of the grand jury probe, they wrote, investigators had already searched multiple email accounts maintained by Cohen. Those emails, they said, indicated that Cohen was "performing little to no legal work, and that zero emails were exchanged with President Trump."

"This court should not accept Cohen's invitation to make new law and convert a duly authorized search warrant into a subpoena," prosecutors said, calling it a "dangerous precedent" to let defense lawyers delay a probe "in a case of national interest."

In a footnote, prosecutors wrote that although the investigation was referred to prosecutors by Mueller, it was proceeding independently.

People familiar with the investigation have told The Associated Press the searches carried out Monday sought bank records, records on Cohen's dealing in the taxi industry, Cohen's communications with the Trump campaign and information on payments made in 2016 to a former Playboy model, Karen McDougal, and a porn actress, Stephanie Clifford, who performs under the name Stormy Daniels. Both women say they had affairs with Trump.

Clifford's lawyer, Michael Avenatti, spoke briefly in court. Outside court, he said: "We have every reason to believe that some of the documents seized relate to my client."

Avenatti said it's "very possible" that the porn actress would show up at Monday's hearing. He then followed with a suggestive tweet that "the weather forecast for Mon looks very Stormy."

Public corruption prosecutors in the U.S. attorney's office in Manhattan are trying to determine, according to one person familiar with the investigation, if there was any fraud related to payments to McDougal and Clifford.

Cohen has denied wrongdoing.

McDougal was paid $150,000 in the summer of 2016 by the parent company of the National Enquirer under an agreement that gave it the exclusive rights to her story, which it never published. Cohen said he paid Daniels $130,000 in exchange for her silence about her claim to have had a one-night-stand with Trump.

The White House has consistently said Trump denies either affair.

Categories: Ohio News

Trump vows to back law to protect marijuana industry

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 15:10

President Donald Trump has promised to support legislation protecting the marijuana industry in states that have legalized the drug, a move that could lift a threat to the industry made by the U.S. attorney general just three months ago.

Republican Sen. Cory Gardner of Colorado said Friday that Trump made the pledge to him in a Wednesday night conversation.

Gardner has been pushing to reverse a decision made by Attorney General Jeff Sessions in January that removed prohibitions that kept federal prosecutors from pursuing cases against people who were following pot laws in states such as Colorado that have legalized the drug.

Marijuana has been fully legalized in eight states, and 24 states allow some form of marijuana use.

"President Trump has assured me that he will support a federalism-based legislative solution to fix this states' rights issue once and for all," Gardner said in a statement.

White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Gardner's account was accurate and the president supported states' rights in the matter.

Gardner hopes to introduce bipartisan legislation keeping the federal government from interfering in state marijuana markets.

Marijuana legalization advocates were ebullient.

"We may now be seeing the light at the end of the tunnel," said Mason Tvert, who spearheaded a 2012 ballot measure legalizing recreational marijuana in Colorado. "This is one more step toward ending the irrational policy of marijuana prohibition, not only in Colorado but throughout the country."

During the campaign, Trump said states should be able to chart their own course on marijuana. But Trump has also railed at the dangers of drug-related crime and suggested recreational marijuana should not be permitted.

When he selected Sessions, a former federal prosecutor and U.S. senator from Alabama, as his attorney general, marijuana supporters girded themselves for a crackdown. But Gardner said Sessions had promised him he'd do nothing to interfere with Colorado's robust marijuana market.

Gardner said he was blindsided when Sessions made his announcement in January regarding pot prosecutions.

In retaliation, Gardner used his power as a senator to prevent consideration of any nominees for the Department of Justice — an extraordinary step for a senator to use against an administration run by another member of his party.

Some of Gardner's fellow GOP senators groused at the impact of the hold, and Gardner allowed some nominees to proceed in a "good-faith" gesture last month. On Friday, he said he was fully releasing his holds on Department of Justice nominations.

The action came amid widespread speculation that Trump will remove Justice officials overseeing the Russia investigation. Replacements of any of those officials would require new nominations.

Gardner and the Department of Justice have been in discussions for months to get the holds lifted. Gardner has met with Sessions and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, the official overseeing the Russia probe who has been the target of Trump's ire.

Categories: Ohio News

Police: Woman who drove SUV with family off cliff was drunk

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 14:49

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A woman who drove off a Northern California cliff last month in an SUV carrying her wife and children was drunk, authorities said Friday.

Toxicology tests found Jennifer Hart had an alcohol level of 0.102, said California Patrol Capt. Bruce Carpenter. California drivers are considered drunk with a level of 0.08 or higher.

Toxicology tests also found that her wife Sarah Hart and two of their children had "a significant amount" of an ingredient commonly found in the allergy drug Benadryl, which can make people sleepy. Toxicology results for a third child killed are still pending, Carpenter said.

Carpenter said none of the car's occupants were wearing seatbelts.

Sarah and Jennifer Hart and their six adopted children were believed to be in the family's SUV when it plunged off a cliff in Mendocino County, more than 160 miles north of San Francisco.

The pullout where the SUV of Jennifer and Sarah Hart was recovered off the off Pacific Coast Highway 1, near Westport, Calif. (Kale Williams/The Oregonian via AP)

Authorities have said that data from the vehicle's software suggested the crash was deliberate, though the California Highway Patrol has not concluded why the vehicle went off an ocean overlook on a rugged part of coastline. A specialized team of accident investigators is trying to figure that out with help from the FBI, Carpenter said.

Five bodies were found March 26 near the small city of Mendocino, a few days after Washington state authorities began investigating the Harts for possible child neglect, but three of their children were not immediately recovered from the scene.

Two more are missing and another body has been found but not identified.

The 100-foot (31-meter) drop killed the women, both 39, and their children Markis Hart, 19; Jeremiah Hart, 14; and Abigail Hart, 14. Hannah Hart, 16; Devonte Hart, 15; and Sierra Hart, 12, have not been found.

Categories: Ohio News

1 person killed in motorcycle crash on Alum Creek Drive in Obetz

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 14:25

OBETZ, Ohio - Obetz police officers and deputies with the Franklin County Sheriff's Office are on the scene of a serious crash involving a motorcycle and another vehicle Friday afternoon.

Investigators have closed the southbound lanes of Alum Creek Drive near Rathmell Road.

Sgt. Jay Eden with the Franklin County Sheriff's Office said one person was killed in the crash.

No other information has been released.

Categories: Ohio News

Columbus 12-year-old meets Pope Francis in Vatican City

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 13:53

They say the Lord works in mysterious ways.

12-year-old Peter Lombardi, a fifth-grade student at Saint Andrew School, doesn't believe that. He knows it.

So does his mother.

"What I did is I put my head in my lap and just started crying," Brenda Lombardi said.

Brenda says the trip to Rome was a "gratitude pilgrimage." The devout Catholic family wanted to give thanks for saving Peter's life.

Peter was diagnosed in April of 2015 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. For children with Down syndrome, it's a two-year treatment. The first six months, Brenda says, were filled with intense, high doses of chemo.

Then, in June of 2017, Peter was in remission.

During his treatment, Peter was asked if he had one wish, what would it be? All he had to do was look at the TV to see a man in white who was visiting Philadelphia.

"And he just was saying 'Yeah, my wish is to get a kiss from that man in white who's kissing all those kids'," Brenda said. "And that even surprised me. And I was like your wish is to have Pope Francis kiss you? And he said 'Yeah'."

Unfortunately, time-wise it didn't work out.

But, then came that pilgrimage to give thanks. Brenda was going to buy papal audience tickets, but her tour guide said not to.

"He said 'Brenda, I think we might be able to get him that kiss'," she said.

He managed to get Brenda and Peter to the front of the line.

"They basically said try to get Pope Francis's attention," she said.

A slim chance. An even slimmer chance for what happened next.

"And then [Pope Francis] just stopped and he motioned," she said.

Peter was lifted by security to see Pope Francis. He was given a kiss and a blessing, both placed on the top of his head.

"It's pretty awesome," Peter said.

Then, another blessing.

Peter was motioned back by Pope Francis to sit beside him in the popemobile (Peter says it goes really fast, by the way).

For 20 minutes, Peter rode shotgun with that "man in white."

Since meeting the Pope wasn't Peter's wish, he got to pick again with Make-A-Wish Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana.

"And, that's when he came up with 'I want to fight Darth Vader'," Brenda said.

Peter says he's a big Star Wars fan and his favorite character is Luke Skywalker. He says the reason he wants to battle Darth Vader is because Vader is "a bad guy" and he wants to fight evil.

Battling the most powerful man in the galaxy will be a tall task, no doubt. But, then again, mysterious things happen all the time.

Brenda says Make-A-Wish has granted the Disneyland trip to California. They are working now to determine the best dates for the trip.

Brenda says Peter just had a doctor's checkup and all was "normal." He'll celebrate one year in remission in June.

Categories: Ohio News

School’s Ham Contact with Space Station Raises Amateur Radio’s Visibility in Alabama

ARRL News - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 13:50

An Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) school contact with crew member Ricky Arnold, KE5DAU, was a huge success on more than one level. Fifteen students at Pinson Valley High School in Alabama had the opportunity to chat via ham radio on April 10 in a direct contact with Arnold, who was at the helm of NA1SS for his inaugural ARISS contact. Witnessing the event was an audien...

Categories: Amateur Radio News

Mom, boyfriend plead not guilty in death of Ohio 4-year-old girl

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 13:47

A northeast Ohio woman and her boyfriend have pleaded not guilty to aggravated murder and other charges in the death of the woman's 4-year-old daughter.

A medical examiner says Aniya Day-Garrett died last month in Euclid from a stroke caused by blunt impacts to her head. She was also malnourished.

Her mother, Sierra Day, and Day's boyfriend, Deonte Lewis, pleaded not guilty Thursday and remained jailed on bonds of $1 million.

Messages seeking comment were left Friday for their attorneys.

The girl's father has said he suspected she was being abused. He has called for an investigation into the county's child welfare agency.

The agency has said investigators never found enough evidence to remove the girl from her home.

Police said paramedics found Aniya unresponsive with burn marks on March 11 in Euclid.

Categories: Ohio News

"Something has gone terribly wrong": New details on trapped teen's death

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 13:20

Authorities pledged on Thursday to find out what went wrong in the death of a 16-year-old boy they say became trapped by a minivan bench seat in a school parking lot and whose body was found about six hours after he first called 911.

Police Chief Eliot Isaac said something went "terribly wrong" in Kyle Plush's death. He said a dispatcher was put on administrative leave and the actions of all personnel involved will be reviewed.

Hamilton County prosecutor Joe Deters said his office is trying to identify experts to help its own probe with the coroner's office. The coroner ruled the teenager died of asphyxia, from his chest being compressed.

A telephone message was left for the boy's parents on Thursday.

Isaac called the boy's death "a horrific tragedy."

"We share in their heartbreak," he said.

Plush first called 911 at about 3:15 p.m. Tuesday, saying he was stuck inside a van in "desperate need of help." But he was unable to hear the dispatcher's questions, police said, and a callback to his cellphone after it disconnected went to voicemail. Responding police drove through the area looking for signs of anyone in distress but saw nothing out of the ordinary in the school complex, which has several parking areas.

A county sheriff's deputy on traffic duty at the school also checked around, police said.

Plush called 911 again at around 3:35 p.m. Police said this time he provided a description of the vehicle as he desperately pleaded for help but couldn't hear the dispatcher. Isaac said the information didn't get relayed to officers at the scene.

"This is not a joke," the teen said over 911. "I'm almost dead."

He asked the dispatcher to "tell my mom I love her if I die."

Police were unable to locate the boy on any of several parking lots of the Seven Hills School complex.

Police said a friend called the boy's parents that evening saying he hadn't shown up as planned for a tennis match. His mother used an app to locate his phone at Seven Hills. They called the county dispatch center, and police said family members then arrived at the unlocked vehicle with the unresponsive teen inside. Police and fire responders getting there just before 9 p.m. were unable to revive him.

The Seven Hills School , a private academy in Cincinnati for students from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade, sent out a message saying Plush had been a student there since sixth grade.

"He was a young man of keen intelligence, good humor and great courage, and this whole community feels this loss very deeply," the school said.

Classmate Preston Luniewski told WLWT-TV that Plush "was truly a spectacular person."

"He just lit up the classroom," Luniewski said.

Authorities indicated Plush was in the rear of the minivan when he became trapped by a seat.

A Honda spokesman identified the vehicle as a 2004 Honda Odyssey and said there had been no seat-related recalls for that model.

"Our hearts go out to the victim's family during this difficult time," spokesman Chris Martin said. "Honda does not have any specific information from which to definitively determine what occurred in this incident."

Isaac said police will study possible police equipment malfunctions.

Mayor John Cranley, a Democrat, urged prayers for the Plush family, saying, "our hearts are heavy."

Categories: Ohio News

Columbus Zoo to host job fairs for summer positions

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 12:17

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium is hosting several job fairs this spring for positions at the zoo, Zoombezi Bay and Safari Golf Club.

The zoo will be hiring for positions in areas including food and beverage, facilities, guest relations, security, membership processing, rides, lifeguards and retail.

Applicants can attend open interviews for food and beverage and retail positions on April 14 or open interviews for rides and attractions positions on April 14 or April 20.

Zoombezi Bay will hold an open interview, called a “swimmerview,” for seasonal lifeguards on April 13, 19 or May 11 at the Worthington Natatorium, or on April 27 at the Delaware YMCA.

Applicants must be 16 years of age or older.

For more details on the hiring process, click here.

Seasonal Job Fairs

  • Saturday, April 21 from 2 p.m. – 4 p.m. in the Zoo’s Education Building Classroom A (Lifeguard Job Fair)
  • Saturday, April 28 from 1 p.m. – 3 p.m. in the Zoo’s Lakeside Pavilion

Swimmerviews (Lifeguard Interviews)

  • Friday, April 13 from 5 p.m.– 7:30 p.m. at the Worthington Natatorium
  • Thursday, April 19 from 4 p.m. – 7 p.m. at the Worthington Natatorium
  • Friday, April 27 from 5 p.m.– 7:30 p.m. at the Delaware YMCA
  • Friday, May 11 from 4 p.m.– 7 p.m. at the Worthington Natatorium

Food and Beverage and Retail Open Interviews

  • Saturday, April 14 from 1 p.m. – 3 p.m. in the Zoo’s Lakeside Pavilion

Rides and Attractions Interviews

  • Saturday, April 14 from 12 p.m.– 2 p.m. in the Zoo’s Education Building
  • Friday, April 20 from 4 p.m.– 6 p.m. in the Zoo’s Education Building
ZOOMBEZI BAY 2018 SEASON HOURS

May 19 - 20 Opening weekend - 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.
May 24 - 25 Special hours for Zoombezi Bay Education Day - 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
May 26 - June 7 from 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.
June 8 - August 12 from 10:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.
August 13 - 17 Back to School Week - 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
August 18 - 19, 25-26 WEEKENDS ONLY through Labor Day - 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.
September 1 - 3 WEEKENDS ONLY through Labor Day - 10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Categories: Ohio News

Trump pardons former Cheney aide Scooter Libby

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 11:37

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump issued a full pardon Friday to I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, a former top aide to Vice President Dick Cheney.

Trump said he does not know Libby, but "for years I have heard that he has been treated unfairly. Hopefully, this full pardon will help rectify a very sad portion of his life," according to a statement issued by White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders announcing the pardon.

Libby, Cheney's former chief of staff, was convicted of lying to investigators and obstruction of justice following the 2003 leak of the covert identity of CIA officer Valerie Plame. President George W. Bush later commuted Libby's 30-month prison sentence but didn't issue a pardon despite intense pressure from Cheney. No one was ever charged for the leak.

Since then, the Libby case has been criticized by conservatives, who argue he was the victim of an overly zealous and politically motivated prosecution by a special counsel. Another twist is that the special counsel, Patrick Fitzgerald, was appointed by James Comey, deputy attorney general at the time. Comey later became head of the FBI, but was fired by Trump, and has since written a book highly critical of the president.

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway, while declining at the time to confirm Trump's plans for a pardon, said earlier Friday that "many people think that Scooter Libby was the victim of a special counsel gone amok." Asked if a pardon would be about Comey, Conway said no.

Plame appeared on MSNBC Friday morning and said a pardon would send a message "that you can commit crimes against national security and you will be pardoned."

The pardon was the third for Trump. He granted one last year for former Arizona sheriff Joe Arpaio, who was awaiting sentencing for contempt of court. Trump also pardoned a U.S. Navy sailor, who was convicted after taking photos of classified portions of a submarine.

Conservative criticism of the special counsel in the Plame case echoes critiques of Robert Mueller, the special counsel leading an investigation into Russian election interference, possible coordination with Trump associates and potential obstruction of justice by the president. Trump has called that probe a "witch hunt."

Categories: Ohio News

DX Operators Establishing New Logbook of The World Accounts May E-Mail Documentation

ARRL News - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 11:19

Amateur Radio operators from outside the US who are requesting an initial call sign certificate to establish a new Logbook of The World (LoTW) user account now may submit the required documentation via e-mail. Non-US radio amateurs must provide a copy of their Amateur Radio license or authorization, plus a copy of one other government-issued document showing the applicant’s name and address (se...

Categories: Amateur Radio News

Face the State with Scott Light | April 15, 2018

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 11:15

This week on Face The State with Scott Light:

  • Medical marijuana in Ohio. Former Ohio representative John Boehner joins an advisory board to legalize marijuana, reversing his long-standing position on the controversial drug. Our panelists discuss the future of pot in Ohio.
  • Ohio House Speaker Cliff Rosenberger steps down. Who is the best choice to replace him in our state legislature?
  • Ohio Democratic candidates for governor debate gun laws in Ohio. An analysis on their chances of pushing through new laws, and getting elected to lead the state.

Guests this week:

  • Brad Sinnott- lawyer and chair of the central committee of the Franklin County Republican Party.
  • Jo Ingles- a veteran reporter and producer for the Ohio Statehouse News Bureau.
  • Sandy Theis - former journalist and Executive Director of Progress Ohio.
Categories: Ohio News

Franklin County Dog Shelter “Friday the 13th” Adoptions Special, waives adoption fees this weekend

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 08:51

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- If you have been considering adopting a dog, this weekend is an opportunity to do so for free.

The Franklin County Dog Shelter has had an increase of lost dogs entering the shelter due to the warm weather.

Officials say they will be waiving the adoption fees this weekend as apart of their Friday the 13th Adoption Special.

The shelter hopes this special will land over 90 dogs into new permanent homes.

The adoption fee waiver does exclude deaf dogs.

For more information on the Franklin County, Dog Shelter click here.

Categories: Ohio News

Heinz asks if America is ready for Mayochup

Channel 10 news - Fri, 04/13/2018 - 08:38

PITTSBURGH — What do you get when you combine mayonnaise and ketchup?

A debate on Twitter after Heinz on Thursday launched a poll asking Americans if they'd like a pre-made combination of the condiments called Mayochup. Heinz will bring the product, which is currently available in parts of the Middle East, to the United States if the poll closes on Sunday with 500,000 votes in its favor.

Some respondents like the idea. But others say it's been around as Fry Sauce in Utah and Salsa Rosada in Latin America. Then there are those who say the combo is just short of relish from becoming a salad dressing or special sauce.

The debate also includes the name Mayochup. Heinz says it's committed to putting the final name up for a vote.

Categories: Ohio News

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