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North Country at Work: exploring the ghost town of Griffin in southern Hamilton County

North Country Public Radio - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 22:00
If you wanted to visit the town of Griffin today, you'd have to head toward the town of Wells, located on the Sacandaga River in southern Hamilton County. Travel down Route 8 (also called Griffin Road) and you'll find empty foundations, old pipes, and one or two buildings.
Categories: News

Dairy farmer co-op hosting industry summit in Albany

North Country Public Radio - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 22:00
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) - Hundreds of dairy farmers from the Northeast will be gathering in Albany for an industry summit to discuss such issues as low milk prices.
Categories: News

NY to invest $1.5M in 'farm-to-school' lunch programs

North Country Public Radio - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 22:00
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) - New York state will invest $1.5 million in additional funds in efforts to bring fresh, locally grown farm products to public schools in the coming school year.
Categories: News

Capitol Watch: Cuomo continues to duck debates

North Country Public Radio - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 22:00
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) - Cynthia Nixon is calling out Gov. Andrew Cuomo for ducking debates ahead of next month's Democratic primary for governor.
Categories: News

VT artists experiment with sound, space and light in abandoned motel

North Country Public Radio - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 22:00
There's a string of islands that run across Lake Champlain from the top of New York State to Vermont, and on one causeway, there's an old motel called the Sandbar Inn. It was built in the 1950s and closed in the early 2000s. Now it sits empty, dilapidated, and it looks a little haunted.But for three nights this summer, it came to life. A group called Overnight Projects invited artists to use the motel and its rooms for an exhibition called "From Away." Zach Hirsch had a chance to see it before it disappeared.
Categories: News

Fort Drum, and Stefanik, prepare to welcome President Trump

North Country Public Radio - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 22:00
Fort Drum is making final preparations for its first presidential visit since Barack Obama came to the Army base near Watertown in 2011.
Categories: News

TWiT 679: Hotbox the Waymo

This week in tech - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 20:35
  • Samsung Announces the Galaxy Note 9, Galaxy Watch, and Galaxy Home musical cauldron.
  • What is AI?
  • Self-driving roll-out is increasing.
  • Amazon wants you to pick up groceries at Whole Foods, and wishes you would shop more using Alexa.
  • Twitter refuses to drop Alex Jones and InfoWars.
  • Microsoft preserves Skype Classic.
  • 11-year-old hacks Florida voting systems at DefCon and other voting security woes.
  • Boston Dynamics is pumping out SpotMinis.

Host: Leo Laporte

Guests: Matt Cutts, Florence Ion, and Sam Abuelsamid

Download or subscribe to this show at https://twit.tv/shows/this-week-in-tech

Sponsors:

Categories: Podcasts, Technology

2 men stabbed in Bellefontaine apartment, suspect in custody

Channel 10 news - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 19:55

BELLEFONTAINE — Police in Bellefontaine say two men were stabbed in their apartment and a suspect is in custody.

The Bellefontaine Examiner reports that one of the men stumbled into a Walmart store early Sunday bleeding profusely. Police followed a trail back to his apartment and found his roommate, who also was critically injured. Both were flown to hospitals.

Police say a suspect was later found and taken into custody. The three were not identified.

An investigation is continuing.

Categories: Ohio News

FBI Warns of ‘Unlimited’ ATM Cashout Blitz

Krebs on Security - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 18:28

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is warning banks that cybercriminals are preparing to carry out a highly choreographed, global fraud scheme known as an “ATM cash-out,” in which crooks hack a bank or payment card processor and use cloned cards at cash machines around the world to fraudulently withdraw millions of dollars in just a few hours.

“The FBI has obtained unspecified reporting indicating cyber criminals are planning to conduct a global Automated Teller Machine (ATM) cash-out scheme in the coming days, likely associated with an unknown card issuer breach and commonly referred to as an ‘unlimited operation’,” reads a confidential alert the FBI shared with banks privately on Friday.

The FBI said unlimited operations compromise a financial institution or payment card processor with malware to access bank customer card information and exploit network access, enabling large scale theft of funds from ATMs.

“Historic compromises have included small-to-medium size financial institutions, likely due to less robust implementation of cyber security controls, budgets, or third-party vendor vulnerabilities,” the alert continues. “The FBI expects the ubiquity of this activity to continue or possibly increase in the near future.”

Organized cybercrime gangs that coordinate unlimited attacks typically do so by hacking or phishing their way into a bank or payment card processor. Just prior to executing on ATM cashouts, the intruders will remove many fraud controls at the financial institution, such as maximum ATM withdrawal amounts and any limits on the number of customer ATM transactions daily.

The perpetrators also alter account balances and security measures to make an unlimited amount of money available at the time of the transactions, allowing for large amounts of cash to be quickly removed from the ATM.

“The cyber criminals typically create fraudulent copies of legitimate cards by sending stolen card data to co-conspirators who imprint the data on reusable magnetic strip cards, such as gift cards purchased at retail stores,” the FBI warned. “At a pre-determined time, the co-conspirators withdraw account funds from ATMs using these cards.”

Virtually all ATM cashout operations are launched on weekends, often just after financial institutions begin closing for business on Saturday. Last month, KrebsOnSecurity broke a story about an apparent unlimited operation used to extract a total of $2.4 million from accounts at the National Bank of Blacksburg in two separate ATM cashouts between May 2016 and January 2017.

In both cases, the attackers managed to phish someone working at the Blacksburg, Virginia-based small bank. From there, the intruders compromised systems the bank used to manage credits and debits to customer accounts.

The 2016 unlimited operation against National Bank began Saturday, May 28, 2016 and continued through the following Monday. That particular Monday was Memorial Day, a federal holiday in the United States, meaning bank branches were closed for more than two days after the heist began. All told, the attackers managed to siphon almost $570,000 in the 2016 attack.

The Blacksburg bank hackers struck again on Saturday, January 7, and by Monday Jan 9 had succeeded in withdrawing almost $2 million in another unlimited ATM cashout operation.

The FBI is urging banks to review how they’re handling security, such as implementing strong password requirements and two-factor authentication using a physical or digital token when possible for local administrators and business critical roles.

Other tips in the FBI advisory suggested that banks:

-Implement separation of duties or dual authentication procedures for account balance or withdrawal increases above a specified threshold.

-Implement application whitelisting to block the execution of malware.

-Monitor, audit and limit administrator and business critical accounts with the authority to modify the account attributes mentioned above.

-Monitor for the presence of remote network protocols and administrative tools used to pivot back into the network and conduct post-exploitation of a network, such as Powershell, cobalt strike and TeamViewer.

-Monitor for encrypted traffic (SSL or TLS) traveling over non-standard ports.

-Monitor for network traffic to regions wherein you would not expect to see outbound connections from the financial institution.

Categories: Technology, Virus Info

Koepka holds off Woods to win PGA Championship

Channel 10 news - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 17:48

ST. LOUIS — Brooks Koepka is impossible to overlook now, winning the PGA Championship on Sunday with machine-like precision to go with his back-to-back U.S. Open titles.

And it still felt — and sounded — like he was playing second billing to Tiger Woods.

With roars for Woods unheard anywhere this side of Augusta National, Koepka kept his cool and ran off two birdies on the back nine at Bellerive with Adam Scott tied for the lead and Woods one shot behind.

Koepka closed with a 4-under 66 for a two-shot victory, making him only the fifth player to win the U.S. Open and PGA Championship in the same year.

"The crowds here, they let you know what's going on," Koepka said with a big grin. "The beginning of the back nine, I could hear all the roars. When Tiger started making his little run, and Scotty made his run, it got loud."

Even with two bogeys, Woods shot 64 for his lowest final round in a major.

"I played hard," Woods said. "I made a bit of a run. It looks like I'm going to come up a little short."

Koepka was responsible for that.

After wasting one chance to put it away, Koepka ran kept attacking flags and ran in birdie putts of 10 feet on No. 15 and 7 feet on No. 16 to end the drama. He tapped in for par on the final hole to set the PGA Championship scoring record at 264.

It also tied the major championship record that Henrik Stenson set at Royal Troon two years ago in the British Open.

Koepka has won three of the last six majors he played, and two of three this year alone. He joined Woods, Jack Nicklaus, Ben Hogan and Gene Sarazen as the only players to win the two U.S. majors that rotate to different courses in the same year.

The 28-year-old Floridian also joined Jordan Spieth, Woods, Nicklaus and Tom Watson as the only players with three majors before turning 30 since World War II.

Scott hung around by making big putts, just like he hoped, and was tied for the lead until Koepka's birdies. Scott missed a 6-foot birdie putt on the par-5 17th that would have pulled him to within one shot — right after Koepka missed from the same range — and then made bogey on the 18th for a 67 to finish alone in third.

The St. Louis fans waited 17 years to see Woods — he last was at Bellerive when the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks canceled a World Golf Championship — and he delivered a performance that took golf back in time.

Thomas Bjorn might have seen it coming. Earlier in the week, as he was cleaning out his locker after withdrawing with an injury, he thought back to Woods getting into contention at Carnoustie last month at the British Open. "He recognized who that guy was that day," Bjorn said.

Woods was relentless, pumping fists, raising the putter in his left hand, making birdies and charging toward a finish that caused pure pandemonium among one of the largest and noisiest crowds at a major.

Without hitting a fairway on the front nine, Woods cut the four-shot deficit to two.

Dialed in on the back nine, he dropped an approach into 4 feet on No. 12, got within one shot with a 10-foot birdie on the par-3 13th and, after a bad drive led to bogey, he answered with another approach that hit a foot from the hole.

That was as good as it got.

Facing the most important drive of the day on the par-5 17th, Woods sent it sailing to the right and it embedded in a hazard along the banks of a creek. He did well to advance it, but had to save par from a bunker. Behind him, Koepka holed his two birdie putts.

Woods and Koepka played nine holes of a practice round on Wednesday, and the 14-time major champion knew what he was up against.

"It's tough to beat when the guy hits it 340 down the middle," Woods said. "What he did at Shinnecock, just bombing it, and then he's doing the same thing here. ... And when a guy's doing that and hitting it straight, and as good a putter as he is, it's tough to beat."

Koepka never imagined a year like this. He missed four months at the start of the year when a partially torn tendon in his left wrist, causing him to sit out the Masters. He outlasted good friend Dustin Johnson at Shinnecock Hills to become the first back-to-back U.S. Open champion in 29 years.

And now this.

Koepka joked about working out in a public gym this week with Dustin Johnson and not being recognized. He has been motivated by more serious moments, from being left off the "notable scores" section of TV coverage at tournaments and even last week, when he was not summoned for a TV interview to preview the PGA Championship.

He now is No. 2 in the world, with a shot at overtaking Johnson in two weeks when the FedEx Cup playoffs start.

Justin Thomas also had a chance to join Woods as the only back-to-back PGA champions in stroke play, and he was tied for the lead briefly on the front nine when Koepka missed fairways and made two straight bogeys. Thomas turned birdie into bogey at the turn with a three-putt from 5 feet, and he missed a short par putt on the 14th to fall back. He shot 68 and tied for sixth.

Even with 17 players separated by three shots at one point on the front nine, everyone had to catch Koepka, Woods included.

Categories: Ohio News

Orca back to feeding, frolicking after carrying dead calf

Channel 10 news - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 17:36

FRIDAY HARBOR, Wash. — Researchers say an endangered killer whale that drew international attention as she carried her dead calf on her head for more than two weeks is finally back to feeding and frolicking with her pod.

The Center for Whale Research in Washington state says it watched the orca, known as J35, chase a school of salmon in Haro Strait west of San Juan Island on Saturday afternoon.

The whales have been struggling because of a lack of salmon, and J35's calf died soon after birth on July 24. The mother carried the baby on her head for at least 17 days, in an image of grief that struck an emotional chord worldwide.

She finally abandoned the carcass as it decomposed.

Center for Whale Research founder Ken Balcomb says he is immensely relieved to see J35 returning to typical behavior.

Categories: Ohio News

Charlottesville victim's mother: 'So much healing to do'

Channel 10 news - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 17:05

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. — The mother of a woman killed when a car plowed into a crowd of counterprotesters at a white nationalist rally last summer said Sunday there's much healing to do a year after the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Heather Heyer's mother, Susan Bro, laid flowers at a makeshift memorial at the site of the attack in downtown Charlottesville. With a crowd gathered around her, she thanked them for coming to remember her daughter but also acknowledged the dozens of others injured and the two state troopers killed when a helicopter crashed that day.

"There's so much healing to do," Bro said. "We have a huge racial problem in our city and in our country. We have got to fix this or we'll be right back here in no time."

The vigil was one in a series of largely peaceful community events held in Charlottesville over the weekend to mark the one-year anniversary of the rally, one of the largest gatherings of white nationalists and other far-right extremists in a decade.

Some 115 miles (185 kilometers) away in Washington, Jason Kessler, the principal organizer of last year's "Unite the Right" event, led what he called a white civil rights rally Sunday afternoon in Lafayette Square in front of the White House.

President Donald Trump wasn't home — he has been at his golf club in New Jersey for more than a week on a working vacation.

Kessler said in his permit application that he expected 100 to 400 people to participate in his event, though the number appeared it might be far lower. Just before 4 p.m., a contingent of about 30 white nationalists began marching through the streets.

Counterprotesters assembled ahead of the rally's scheduled start vastly outnumbered Kessler's crowd. By midafternoon, more than 1,000 people had already gathered in Freedom Plaza, also near the White House, to oppose Kessler's demonstration and they too planned to march to Lafayette Square.

Makia Green, who represents the Washington branch of Black Lives Matter, told Sunday's crowd that: "We know from experience that ignoring white nationalism doesn't work."

Earlier this month, Facebook stunned and angered counterprotest organizers when it disabled their Washington event's page, saying it and others had been created by "bad actors" misusing the social media platform. The company said at the time that the page may be linked to an account created by Russia's Internet Research Agency — a so-called troll farm that has sown discord in the U.S. — but counterprotesters said it was an authentic event they worked hard to organize.

Government and police officials in Washington have expressed confidence the city can manage the events without violence; the mayor and police chief have promised a massive security mobilization to keep protesters and counterprotesters apart.

Earlier in the day in Charlottesville, more than 200 people gathered in a park to protest racism and mark the anniversary. The group sang songs and listened to speakers, among them Courtney Commander, a friend of Heyer's who was with her when she was killed.

"She is with me today, too," Commander said.

Last year on Aug. 12, hundreds of white nationalists — including neo-Nazis, skinheads and Ku Klux Klan members — descended on Charlottesville in part to protest the city's decision decided to remove a monument to Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from a park.

Fighting broke out between attendees and counterprotesters. Authorities eventually forced the crowd to disperse, but a car later barreled into the crowd of peaceful counterprotesters.

A state police helicopter later crashed, killing Lt. Jay Cullen and Trooper-Pilot Berke Bates.

Law enforcement officials faced blistering criticism in the aftermath of last year's rally for what was perceived as a passive response to the violence that unfolded. A review by a former U.S. attorney found a lack of coordination between state and city police and an operational plan that elevated officer safety over public safety.

The anniversary weekend was marked by a much heavier police presence, which also drew criticism from some activists.

At one point Sunday, demonstrators marched through Charlottesville, chanting, "Cops and Klan go hand in hand," and "Will you protect us?"

Categories: Ohio News

Omarosa says she secretly taped her firing, plays audio

Channel 10 news - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 14:25

BRIDGEWATER, N.J. — Former presidential adviser Omarosa Manigault Newman said Sunday she secretly recorded conversations she had in the White House, including her firing by chief of staff John Kelly in the high-security Situation Room. It was a highly unusual admission, which immediately drew fire from allies of the president and national security experts.

Parts of her conversation with Kelly were played on the air when she appeared on NBC's "Meet the Press" to promote her new book, "Unhinged," which will be released next week. The Associated Press independently listened to the recording of the conversation between Manigault Newman and Kelly, which she said was one of many she'd surreptitiously recorded for her own protection.

In her book, Manigault Newman paints a damning picture of President Donald Trump, including claiming without evidence that tapes exist of him using the N-word as he filmed his "The Apprentice" reality series, on which she co-starred.

Manigault Newman said in the book that she had not personally heard the recording. But she told Chuck Todd on Sunday that, after the book had closed, she was able to hear a recording of Trump during a trip to Los Angeles.

"I heard his voice as clear as you and I are sitting here," she said on the show.

But the other recording she discussed Sunday could prove equally explosive.

"Who in their right mind thinks it's appropriate to secretly record the White House chief of staff in the Situation Room?" tweeted Ronna McDaniel, chair of the Republican National Committee.

In the recording, which Manigault Newman quotes extensively in the book, Kelly can be heard saying she can look at her time at the White House as a year of "service to the nation" and referring to potential "difficulty in the future relative to your reputation."

Manigault Newman said she viewed the comment as a "threat" and defended her decision to covertly record it and other White House conversations, describing it as a form of protection.

"If I didn't have these recordings, no one in America would believe me," she said.

The Situation Room is a Sensitive Compartmented Information Facility, or SCIF, where the nation's most consequential foreign policy decisions are made, and staff are not permitted to bring in cell phones or other recording devices.

"I've never heard of a more serious breach of protocol," said Ned Price, who served as spokesman of the National Security Council in the Obama administration. "Not only is it not typical, something like this is unprecedented."

Price said there is no one checking staffers for devices at the door, but there is a sign outside the room making clear that electronic devices are prohibited.

"The Situation Room is the inner-most sanctum of a secure campus," he said, describing the breach as part of a culture of disregarding security protocols in the Trump White House. He also questioning why Kelly would ever choose to have such a meeting there.

The White House did not immediately respond to questions about the tape, but has tried to discredit the book. White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders called it "riddled with lies and false accusations" and Trump on Saturday labeled Manigault Newman a "lowlife."

Katrina Pierson, an adviser to Trump's re-election campaign who served as a spokeswoman for his 2016 campaign, said she had never heard Trump use the kind of derogatory language Manigault Newman alleges. She said in a statement that she feels "pity for Omarosa as she embarrasses herself by creating salacious lies and distortions just to try to be relevant and enrich herself by selling books at the expense of the truth. 'Unhinged,' indeed."

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway also questioned Manigault Newman's credibility in an interview Sunday on ABC's "This Week."

"The first time I ever heard Omarosa suggest those awful things about this president are in this book," she said, noting Manigault Newman "is somebody who gave a glowing appraisal of Donald Trump the businessman, the star of the 'The Apprentice,' the candidate and, indeed, the president of the United States."

Conway said that, in her more than two years working with Trump, she has never heard him use a racial slur about anyone.

Manigault Newman had indeed been a staunch defender of the president for years, including pushing back, as the highest-profile African-American in the White House, on accusations that he was racist.

But Manigault Newman now says she was "used" by Trump for years, calling him a "con" who "has been masquerading as someone who is actually open to engaging with diverse communities" and is "truly a racist."

"I was complicit with this White House deceiving this nation," she said. "I had a blind spot where it came to Donald Trump."

Categories: Ohio News

Billboards oppose Confederate flag sales at northeast Ohio fair

Channel 10 news - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 13:40

WELLINGTON, Ohio — A coalition opposed to the sale of Confederate flags at a county fair in northeast Ohio has posted billboards objecting to those sales.

Jeanine Donaldson, executive director of the Elyria and Lorain YWCAs, said the Fair-minded Coalition of Lorain County has posted three billboards in Lorain County with funding from the Lorain YWCA, The Chronicle-Telegram in Elyria reported.

The billboards include the phrase: "Indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. Keep Your Pledge! SAY NO to the Confederate Flag at the Lorain County Fair." They also show an image of the American flag.

Donaldson said the Fair-minded Coalition was formed in 2016 under the YWCA's social justice umbrella which addresses the mission of eliminating racism and empowering women.

"Once the Ohio State Fair banned the sale of the flags in 2015, we thought other counties would do likewise," Donaldson said. "It seemed like a no-brainer."

Lorain County Fair president Ron Pickworth said every organization can make its own decision about the flag sales.

He said he believes people should have the right to buy Confederate flags and that those sales will be allowed at this year's fair, which will start Aug. 20.

"It's part of freedom of speech to let it continue to be sold," he said.

Lorain County Commissioner Matt Lundy, a Democrat, called on the fair board to ban the sale of the Confederate flag in 2015 calling it, at the time, "a symbol of hatred and division." He says he still believes the flag should not be sold or displayed at the fair.

"We need unity in this country, not division and hate," Lundy said Friday.

Pickworth said the flag vendor plans on returning to the fair this year.

Categories: Ohio News

Police arrest suspect in Gotham bar shooting

Channel 10 news - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 08:53

MARION - Police have arrested a suspect in a shooting inside the Gotham bar that left one man injured last month in downtown Marion.

Police received a tip Sunday just after 12:00 a.m. that the suspect, Lloyd Hinton was inside a home in the 200 block of Pennsylvania Avenue.

The occupants of the home did not initially cooperate and a search warrant was obtained for Hinton, according to investigators.

Before the search warrant could be served, Hinton exited the home and was arrested without incident and taken to Multi-County Correctional Center for his warrant stemming from the shooting.

Several others were charged with misdemeanor offenses from the incident inside the home. Qwan Moore, 20, of Columbus was found with possession of marijuana and heroin and was charged with Felony Obstructing Justice and Underage Consumption. He also was charged for bringing drugs into the Multi-County Correctional Center.

Alle Reed, 20, of Marion was charged with Felony Obstructing Justice and Underage Consumption.

Categories: Ohio News

New law seeks comprehensive approach to Alzheimer's disease

Channel 10 news - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 08:08

BOSTON — A new Massachusetts law seeks to make improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer's and dementia.

The measure was approved by the Democratic-controlled Legislature and signed last week by Republican Gov. Charlie Baker, who noted the impact Alzheimer's has on people, whether they have the disease or are caring for someone with it.

The law requires doctors, physician's assistants and nurses to receive training on the diagnosis, treatment and care for people with Alzheimer's.

It also requires that doctors report an initial diagnosis of the disease to a family member of the patient, and provide the family with information and treatment options.

Democratic Rep. Danielle Gregoire, who sponsored the bill with Democratic Sen. Barbara L'Italien, said Massachusetts is the first U.S. state to develop a "comprehensive approach" to the crisis.

Categories: Ohio News

NASA spacecraft rockets toward sun for closest look yet

Channel 10 news - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 06:33

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — A NASA spacecraft zoomed toward the sun Sunday on an unprecedented quest to get closer to our star than anything ever sent before.

As soon as this fall, the Parker Solar Probe will fly straight through the wispy edges of the sun's corona, or outer atmosphere, that was visible during last August's total solar eclipse. It eventually will get within 3.8 million of the surface in the years ahead, staying comfortably cool despite the extreme heat and radiation, and allowing scientists to vicariously explore the sun in a way never before possible.

No wonder scientists consider it the coolest, hottest mission under the sun, and what better day to launch to the sun than Sunday as NASA noted.

"All I can say is, 'Wow, here we go.' We're in for some learning over the next several years," said Eugene Parker, the 91-year-old astrophysicist for whom the spacecraft is named.

Protected by a revolutionary new carbon heat shield and other high-tech wonders, the spacecraft will zip past Venus in October. That will set up the first solar encounter in November.

Altogether, the Parker probe will make 24 close approaches to the sun on the seven-year, $1.5 billion undertaking.

For the second straight day, thousands of spectators jammed the launch site in the middle of the night as well as surrounding towns, including Parker and his family. He proposed the existence of solar wind — a steady, supersonic stream of particles blasting off the sun — 60 years ago.

It was the first time NASA named a spacecraft after someone still alive, and Parker wasn't about to let it take off without him. Saturday morning's launch attempt was foiled by last-minute technical trouble. But Sunday gave way to complete success.

The Delta IV Heavy rocket thundered into the pre-dawn darkness, thrilling onlookers for miles around as it climbed through a clear, star-studded sky. NASA needed the mighty 23-story rocket, plus a third stage, to get the diminutive Parker probe — the size of a small car and well under a ton — racing toward the sun.

From Earth, it is 93 million miles to the sun, and the Parker probe will be within 4 percent of that distance at its closest. That will be seven times closer than the previous spacecraft.

"Go, baby, go!" project scientist Nicola Fox of Johns Hopkins University shouted at liftoff.

It was the first rocket launch ever witnessed by Parker, professor emeritus at the University of Chicago. He came away impressed, saying it was like looking at the Taj Mahal for years in photos and then beholding "the real thing" in India.

"I really have to turn from biting my nails in getting it launched, to thinking about all the interesting things which I don't know yet and which will be made clear, I assume, over the next five or six or seven years," Parker said on NASA TV.

NASA's science mission chief, Thomas Zurbuchen, was thrilled not only with the launch but Parker's presence.

"I'm in awe," Zurbuchen said. "What a milestone. Also what's so cool is hanging out with Parker during all this and seeing his emotion, too."

Parker, the probe, will start shattering records this fall. On its very first brush with the sun, it will come within 15.5 million miles, easily beating the current record of 27 million miles set by NASA's Helios 2 spacecraft in 1976. Zurbuchen expects the data from even this early stage to yield top science papers.

By the time Parker gets to its 22nd, 23rd and 24th orbits of the sun in 2024 and 2025, it will be even deeper into the corona and traveling at a record-breaking 430,000 mph.

Nothing from Planet Earth has ever hit that kind of speed.

Even Fox has difficulty comprehending the mission's derring-do.

"To me, it's still mind-blowing," she said. "Even I still go, really? We're doing that?"

Zurbuchen considers the sun the most important star in our universe — it's ours, after all — and so this is one of NASA's big-time strategic missions. By better understanding the sun's life-giving and sometimes violent nature, Earthlings can better protect satellites and astronauts in orbit, and power grids on the ground, he noted. In today's tech-dependent society, everyone stands to benefit.

With this first-of-its-kind stellar mission, scientists hope to unlock the many mysteries of the sun, a commonplace yellow dwarf star around 4.5 billion years old. Among the puzzlers: Why is the corona hundreds of times hotter than the surface of the sun and why is the sun's atmosphere continually expanding and accelerating, as Parker accurately predicted in 1958?

"The only way we can do that is to finally go up and touch the sun," Fox said. "We've looked at it. We've studied it from missions that are close in, even as close as the planet Mercury. But we have to go there."

The spacecraft's heat shield will serve as an umbrella, shading the science instruments during the close, critical solar junctures. Sensors on the spacecraft will make certain the heat shield faces the sun at the right times. If there's any tilting, the spacecraft will correct itself so nothing gets fried. With a communication lag time of 16 minutes, the spacecraft must fend for itself at the sun. The Johns Hopkins flight controllers in Laurel, Maryland, will be too far away to help.

A mission to get close up and personal with our star has been on NASA's books since 1958. The trick was making the spacecraft small, compact and light enough to travel at incredible speeds while surviving the sun's punishing environment and the extreme change in temperature when the spacecraft is out near Venus.

"We've had to wait so long for our technology to catch up with our dreams," Fox said. "It's incredible to be standing here today."

More than 1 million names are aboard the spacecraft, submitted last spring by space enthusiasts, as well as photos of Parker, the man, and a copy of his 1958 landmark paper on solar wind.

"I'll bet you 10 bucks it works," Parker said.

Categories: Ohio News

Police look for answers in unsolved 2016 homicide in west Columbus

Channel 10 news - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 06:10

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- The Columbus Division of Police is searching for information that will help them solve a homicide case in west Columbus.

On October 27, 2016, at 8:45 p.m. police were dispatched to a home in the 100 block of Columbian Avenue on a report of a shooting.

When police arrived they found David Lee Hodge, who had been shot several times. He was taken to Mount Carmel West hospital where he later died.

Investigators said prior to the shooting, the unidentified suspects broke out windows to gain entry into the home. Once inside, the suspects went upstairs and were confronted by Hodge and another witness who also resided in the house.

The confrontation resulted in David Lee Hodge being shot by at least one of the suspects while on the stairs, leading from the first floor to the second. The suspects then fled the scene, possibly in a Silver Nissan Rogue.

Authorities believe Hodge may have known the suspects.

Crime Stoppers is offering a cash reward for any information leading to the arrest and/or indictment of the person(s) responsible for this crime. Anyone with information about this crime is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 614-461-TIPS (8477).

Categories: Ohio News

1 critical after stabbing in west Columbus

Channel 10 news - Sun, 08/12/2018 - 05:17

COLUMBUS - One person is in critical condition after a stabbing in west Columbus, according to police.

Authorities told 10TV the stabbing happened Sunday just after 3:17 a.m. on North Terrace Avenue.

The victim was taken to Grant Medical Center in critical condition.

Stay with 10TV and 10TV.com on this developing story.

Categories: Ohio News

1 seriously injured after shooting in west Columbus

Channel 10 news - Sat, 08/11/2018 - 23:21

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- The Columbus Division of Police says two brothers are injured after a shooting in west Columbus.

The shooting happened Sunday just before 12:30 a.m. in the 300 block of South Central Avenue.

The two male shooting victims were transported to Grant Medical Center. One is in serious condition and the other is expected to be OK, according to investigators.

Central Avenue is shut down both ways in the area as police investigate the shooting.

Stay with 10TV and 10TV.com on this developing story.

Categories: Ohio News

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