Ohio News

USA Football unveils council to oversee developmental model

Channel 10 news - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 04:23

USA Football has introduced the council that will oversee the implementation of its Football Development Model for the sport.

The FDM, part of the overall American Development Model for athletes backed by the U.S. Olympic Committee, is a first of its kind framework to help parents, coaches and program leaders provide what players need to develop and grow as athletes and people through football participation. Basically, the FDM is a roadmap for how football is presented, practiced and coached from youth through adulthood.

Chairing the council, it was announced Thursday, will be Dr. Brian Hainline, the NCAA's chief medical officer. Hainline will direct a group featuring doctors, scientists, researchers, coaches, administrators and former players, including Anquan Boldin, a top NFL receiver for most of his 14 pro seasons.

"If we don't get a multitude of perspectives on different levels, that is a disservice," says Scott Hallenbeck, USA Football's CEO. "We will not all agree on every aspect and that will be healthy. We want a professional set of debates and discussions now so that we work toward a consensus. By design, we have a really diverse group of experts in different fields that helps us come together as we pioneer a new approach."

USA Football, the governing body for the sport, is aiming for up to 10 leagues nationwide as FDM pilot programs this fall. By 2020, the FDM formally will be rolled out to schools and youth football programs.

The model is composed of six pillars:

—a whole-person and multisport approach to development;

—a focus on physical literacy and skill development;

—coach education and training;

—creating multiple pathways and options into and within the sport, such as non-contact and flag football, 7-on-7 programs, as well as full contact;

—making football fun and fulfilling;

—participation in the sport and retention of the athletes.

"When we look at football in particular, the sport is undergoing its own sort of existential crisis," Hainline says. "And a lot of info out there is emotionally based as well as factual. There are some really extreme positions, so getting some really respected thought leaders on this board is significant. I am a former player — not a very good one, but I played — and I see the inherent value of all sports if we can learn to do them safely.

"The premise is that football is an aggressive, rugged, contact sport. So learning how to engage your body at a young age in a way that ... will allow you to progress at whatever level you want to progress and play is critical. It's exciting to be able to do this for any sport, but in particular for football, perhaps the most polarizing sport, and where misinformation is most rampant."

Hallenbeck, Hainline and Chris Snyder, USOC director of coaching education, believe a successful FDM could have a major impact on similar models in other sports. Already, such disciplines as ice hockey and tennis have experienced impressive success with their programs.

Many sports under the USOC umbrella have used cross-promotions and cross-marketing approaches. By unifying the message that the ADM programs teach the proper values and safety methods, decrease the cost of play, and make a sport rewarding for participants, Snyder says it "makes for a better product for the right reasons."

"We can all play together in this space," Snyder says. "We're all confident we can build a better product and let kids make decisions on their own. If football does it the way they are showing they want to, the (FDM) will have such an impact throughout. America embraces the sport, and we want to see it played on every level. If football comes out with this — 'Here's is how we are making it ... a sport for everyone, getting more females active, getting more people active' — we only build a better America. We use fitness and health to reduce other issues, and that's part of the puzzle of making America strong."

Categories: Ohio News

Climate threat doubter is leading effort to advise Trump

Channel 10 news - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 04:16

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is exploring the idea of forming a special committee to look at climate change and security risks, with the effort being coordinated by a 79-year-old physicist who rejects mainstream climate science.

A "discussion paper" obtained by The Associated Press asks federal officials from an array of government agencies to weigh in on a proposed executive order that President Donald Trump would sign establishing the "Presidential Committee on Climate Security."

A memo to those federal officials asks them to direct any questions to William Happer, a member of Trump's National Security Council and a well-known critic of mainstream climate science findings.

"Happer would be a fringe figure even for climate skeptics," said retired U.S. Navy Rear Adm. David Titley, now a professor of meteorology at Pennsylvania State University.

Several climate scientists agreed with Titley, including Georgia Tech's Kim Cobb, who said Happer's "false, unscientific notions about climate change represent a danger to the American people."

Harvard science historian Naomi Oreskes, who wrote the book "Merchants of Doubt" on climate denial, pointed to instances when Happer has claimed that carbon dioxide, the main heat-trapping gas from the burning of coal, oil and gas, is good for humans and that carbon emissions have been demonized like "the poor Jews under Hitler."

Happer's bio at Princeton University, where he previously taught, describes him as a pioneer in the field of optically polarized atoms. It notes that he served in the administration of President George H.W. Bush as the director of energy research at the Department of Energy, where he oversaw a basic research budget of roughly $3 billion.

The National Security Council advises the president on security and foreign policy issues. According to the discussion paper, the council would fund and oversee the committee. Among the committee's responsibilities would be to "address existing United States Government reports on climate for scientific accuracy and advise on the national security implications of climate change."

The committee would be composed of 12 members, according to a draft of the executive order. Members would include experts in national security and climate science. The panel would advise the president on how climate "might change in the future under natural and human influences."

A spokesman for the National Security Council declined to comment.

The Washington Post first reported on the proposed executive order establishing the climate security committee.

Trump once tweeted that climate change was a "Chinese hoax." More recently, he used a cold snap that hit much of the nation last month to again cast doubts. "People can't last outside even for minutes. What the hell is going on with Global Waming (sic)? Please come back fast, we need you!" he tweeted.

Both the Pentagon and the president's intelligence team have mentioned climate change as a national security threat, and a 2018 National Climate Assessment detailed drastic effects of global warming.

Over about a dozen years, government scientists, military leaders and intelligence experts have repeatedly highlighted climate change as a major national security risk, said Titley, who founded one such study team in the Navy.

Titley said these studies have come to the same conclusions under three presidents, including two Republicans. He said there are "a surprising number of documents from the Pentagon and intelligence community after January 2017 (when Trump took office) that talk about climate and security risk."

"For the Pentagon, it's about readiness," Titley said. "For the intelligence community, it's about risks. We see the risks are accelerating."

Climate change can "push a marginally stable area into chaos," Titley said, mentioning Syria, which suffered a record drought at the same time as a civil war that triggered a migration of a million people.

Francesco "Frank" Femia, chief executive of a think tank that reviews systemic risk to national and international security, expressed concern that the proposed panel was meant to poke holes in future government reports and studies.

"I would welcome a serious study commissioned by the White House on the security implications on climate change that include climate scientists and national security experts, but this is not that," said Femia, the CEO of The Council on Strategic Risks.

A place like the National Academy of Sciences was set up just for that type of study, said Zeke Hausfather, a climate scientist at Berkeley Earth, which monitors global temperatures.

"The ice doesn't care what this administration thinks," Titley said. "It's just going to keep melting and obeying the laws of physics, whatever Will Happer wants."

Climate threat doubter is leading effort to advise Trump

By KEVIN FREKING and SETH BORENSTEIN, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is exploring the idea of forming a special committee to look at climate change and security risks, with the effort being coordinated by a 79-year-old physicist who rejects mainstream climate science.

A "discussion paper" obtained by The Associated Press asks federal officials from an array of government agencies to weigh in on a proposed executive order that President Donald Trump would sign establishing the "Presidential Committee on Climate Security."

A memo to those federal officials asks them to direct any questions to William Happer, a member of Trump's National Security Council and a well-known critic of mainstream climate science findings.

"Happer would be a fringe figure even for climate skeptics," said retired U.S. Navy Rear Adm. David Titley, now a professor of meteorology at Pennsylvania State University.

Several climate scientists agreed with Titley, including Georgia Tech's Kim Cobb, who said Happer's "false, unscientific notions about climate change represent a danger to the American people."

Harvard science historian Naomi Oreskes, who wrote the book "Merchants of Doubt" on climate denial, pointed to instances when Happer has claimed that carbon dioxide, the main heat-trapping gas from the burning of coal, oil and gas, is good for humans and that carbon emissions have been demonized like "the poor Jews under Hitler."

Happer's bio at Princeton University, where he previously taught, describes him as a pioneer in the field of optically polarized atoms. It notes that he served in the administration of President George H.W. Bush as the director of energy research at the Department of Energy, where he oversaw a basic research budget of roughly $3 billion.

The National Security Council advises the president on security and foreign policy issues. According to the discussion paper, the council would fund and oversee the committee. Among the committee's responsibilities would be to "address existing United States Government reports on climate for scientific accuracy and advise on the national security implications of climate change."

The committee would be composed of 12 members, according to a draft of the executive order. Members would include experts in national security and climate science. The panel would advise the president on how climate "might change in the future under natural and human influences."

A spokesman for the National Security Council declined to comment.

The Washington Post first reported on the proposed executive order establishing the climate security committee.

Trump once tweeted that climate change was a "Chinese hoax." More recently, he used a cold snap that hit much of the nation last month to again cast doubts. "People can't last outside even for minutes. What the hell is going on with Global Waming (sic)? Please come back fast, we need you!" he tweeted.

Both the Pentagon and the president's intelligence team have mentioned climate change as a national security threat, and a 2018 National Climate Assessment detailed drastic effects of global warming.

Over about a dozen years, government scientists, military leaders and intelligence experts have repeatedly highlighted climate change as a major national security risk, said Titley, who founded one such study team in the Navy.

Titley said these studies have come to the same conclusions under three presidents, including two Republicans. He said there are "a surprising number of documents from the Pentagon and intelligence community after January 2017 (when Trump took office) that talk about climate and security risk."

"For the Pentagon, it's about readiness," Titley said. "For the intelligence community, it's about risks. We see the risks are accelerating."

Climate change can "push a marginally stable area into chaos," Titley said, mentioning Syria, which suffered a record drought at the same time as a civil war that triggered a migration of a million people.

Francesco "Frank" Femia, chief executive of a think tank that reviews systemic risk to national and international security, expressed concern that the proposed panel was meant to poke holes in future government reports and studies.

"I would welcome a serious study commissioned by the White House on the security implications on climate change that include climate scientists and national security experts, but this is not that," said Femia, the CEO of The Council on Strategic Risks.

A place like the National Academy of Sciences was set up just for that type of study, said Zeke Hausfather, a climate scientist at Berkeley Earth, which monitors global temperatures.

"The ice doesn't care what this administration thinks," Titley said. "It's just going to keep melting and obeying the laws of physics, whatever Will Happer wants."

Story Details

Categories: Ohio News

2019-02-20 CYGNUS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Wednesday Feb 20, 2019
Time: 6:50 AM
Duration: 1 minute
Maximum Elevation: 13°
Approach: 10° above SSE
Departure: 13° above SE

2019-02-21 ISS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Thursday Feb 21, 2019
Time: 6:49 AM
Duration: 2 minutes
Maximum Elevation: 26°
Approach: 11° above SSW
Departure: 26° above SE

2019-02-22 ISS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Friday Feb 22, 2019
Time: 5:59 AM
Duration: 2 minutes
Maximum Elevation: 14°
Approach: 10° above SSE
Departure: 14° above SE

2019-02-23 CYGNUS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Saturday Feb 23, 2019
Time: 5:50 AM
Duration: 2 minutes
Maximum Elevation: 18°
Approach: 10° above S
Departure: 17° above ESE

2019-02-23 ISS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Saturday Feb 23, 2019
Time: 6:42 AM
Duration: 6 minutes
Maximum Elevation: 73°
Approach: 10° above SW
Departure: 15° above ENE

2019-02-24 ISS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Sunday Feb 24, 2019
Time: 5:52 AM
Duration: 3 minutes
Maximum Elevation: 36°
Approach: 15° above SSW
Departure: 30° above ESE

2019-02-24 CYGNUS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Sunday Feb 24, 2019
Time: 6:02 AM
Duration: 2 minutes
Maximum Elevation: 50°
Approach: 22° above SSW
Departure: 30° above E

2019-02-25 ISS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Monday Feb 25, 2019
Time: 5:03 AM
Duration: 1 minute
Maximum Elevation: 19°
Approach: 19° above SE
Departure: 16° above ESE

2019-02-25 ISS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Monday Feb 25, 2019
Time: 6:36 AM
Duration: 6 minutes
Maximum Elevation: 44°
Approach: 10° above WSW
Departure: 11° above NE

2019-02-26 ISS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Tuesday Feb 26, 2019
Time: 5:47 AM
Duration: 4 minutes
Maximum Elevation: 82°
Approach: 46° above WSW
Departure: 11° above NE

2019-02-27 ISS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Wednesday Feb 27, 2019
Time: 4:58 AM
Duration: less than 1 minute
Maximum Elevation: 24°
Approach: 24° above ENE
Departure: 20° above ENE

2019-02-27 ISS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Wednesday Feb 27, 2019
Time: 6:31 AM
Duration: 5 minutes
Maximum Elevation: 23°
Approach: 11° above WNW
Departure: 11° above NNE

2019-02-28 ISS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Thursday Feb 28, 2019
Time: 5:42 AM
Duration: 3 minutes
Maximum Elevation: 34°
Approach: 34° above NNW
Departure: 10° above NE

2019-03-01 ISS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Friday Mar 1, 2019
Time: 4:53 AM
Duration: 1 minute
Maximum Elevation: 19°
Approach: 19° above NE
Departure: 10° above NE

2019-03-01 ISS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Friday Mar 1, 2019
Time: 6:26 AM
Duration: 4 minutes
Maximum Elevation: 15°
Approach: 10° above NW
Departure: 10° above NNE

2019-03-02 ISS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Saturday Mar 2, 2019
Time: 5:37 AM
Duration: 2 minutes
Maximum Elevation: 19°
Approach: 19° above NNW
Departure: 11° above NNE

2019-03-03 ISS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Sunday Mar 3, 2019
Time: 4:48 AM
Duration: less than 1 minute
Maximum Elevation: 13°
Approach: 13° above NNE
Departure: 11° above NNE

2019-03-03 ISS Sighting

SpotTheStation - Sightings for Marysville - Thu, 02/21/2019 - 03:34
Date: Sunday Mar 3, 2019
Time: 6:22 AM
Duration: 2 minutes
Maximum Elevation: 12°
Approach: 10° above NNW
Departure: 10° above NNE

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