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Updated: 7 min 16 sec ago

Deaths from window blinds show need for cord ban, study says

4 hours 13 min ago

Children's injuries and deaths from window blinds have not stalled despite decades of safety concerns, according to a new U.S. study that recommends a complete ban on blinds with cords.

Nearly 17,000 young children were hurt by window blinds between 1990 and 2015, and though most injuries were minor, almost 300 died, the study shows. Most deaths occurred when children became entangled or strangled by the cords.

Injuries continued even after manufacturers adopted voluntary safety standards including warning labels. The industry now has a plan in the works to make cordless blinds the only option at retail stores and online.

The study "should be a huge wake-up call to the public, to the retailers, to the manufacturers and to parents all over the nation to really see how hazardous the cords on the blinds are," said Linda Kaiser of St Louis. Her 1-year-old daughter died in 2002 from strangulation when she pulled a looped hidden cord from a blind and put it around her neck. Kaiser later formed the advocacy group Parents for Window Blind Safety.

While study's data analysis doesn't show an up or down trend in injuries and deaths, the fact that they're still occurring shows that safety standards have been inadequate, said lead author, Dr. Gary Smith, who directs injuries research at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.

Paul Nathanson, spokesman for the Window Covering Manufacturers Association, said a soon-to-be adopted industry standard drafted with input from the Consumer Product Safety Commission will make corded blinds unavailable in stores and online, although consumers could buy them through custom orders.

The safety commission says windows and window blinds are among the top five hidden hazards in U.S. homes and in a statement, it called the draft standard "a major step forward in protecting children."

That standard is awaiting approval by the American National Standards Institute and is expected to take effect by late 2018, Nathanson said.

Smith said 20 percent are custom blinds and a total ban on corded blinds is needed.

The study was published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.

His research team analyzed 26 years of U.S. government data on emergency room treatment and fatal injuries. The study notes that the dangers have been addressed in medical journal articles as far back as a 1945 report on two accidental hangings in children who survived.

"Seventy years ago we recognized that this was a product that was killing kids," Smith said. "We should put child safety first."

Categories: Ohio News

Columbus police detective raising money for Christmas gifts for children

4 hours 19 min ago

So many times they get a bad wrap; children who, by no fault of their own, never know the joy of finding that perfect gift under the Christmas tree.

Something needed to be done to help, but even he is not sure why he took it upon himself.

"That's a difficult question," Michael Fleming said.

In his line of work, he sees it.

"And, sometimes, unfortunately, we meet young kids that go without things," he said. "Especially on the holidays."

It's why last year he collected gifts for those children.

Media Folder: Media Root

"[It was] exciting for me because I didn't know we were going to get a whole lot of Christmas stuff," Jolei said.

Children like Jolei, 12, who last year received a hoverboard. Her sister, Faith, 10, received a battery-powered car.

They are the ones who get the bad wrap.

"To me, it's sad and depressing," Jolei said.

The uncertainty of circumstance from one day to the next, let alone toys for Christmas.

"It's kind of sad because you never know what can happen," she said. "You never know if you can get something or wish that you're getting something and you don't."

"The innocence of children is heartbreaking when you think about them waking up on Christmas morning with no presents," Fleming said.

In his line of work, he sees it. Fleming, who has more than 20 years working as a detective for the Columbus Police Department. He works in the Special Victims Unit dealing with missing persons, physical abuse and exploited children.

Operation: Thin Blue Line Christmas is on its second year, now. He's raising money, while creating something priceless.

"I want to use that $5 to create a million dollar smile on a child," he said.

It's not about him. It's about them; those who get the bad wrap.

That's why he does it.

"I can't fix poverty," he said. "But, I can make a little kid smile."

Operation: Thin Blue Line Christmas is collecting funds through Christmas for children in need. You can learn more about the initiative and donate here.

Categories: Ohio News

Police searching for vehicle possibly involved in sexual assault near Ohio State campus

5 hours 2 min ago

The Columbus Division of Police is asking the community to help locate a vehicle that is possibly involved with a sexual assault investigation.

Police said the incident happened around 1:30 a.m. on Dec. 9 in the area of West Lane Avenue and North High Street.

A female Ohio State University student entered the vehicle she believed to be associated with a rideshare service.

The student later was able to escape and flagged down a Columbus Police cruiser.

The vehicle is a newer model, white four-door sedan which appears to be missing a hubcap on the driver’s side rear wheel or has a small spare tire mounted on the vehicle.

The driver is described as an Asian male, 23-27 years of age, 6-feet tall, thin build, black hair with a spiked crew cut.

Please email Detective Earl Westfall at SAU@columbuspolice.org if you have any information about this vehicle or driver.

1. Don’t ride up front, no matter what the driver says.

Being in the front seat might make the rider more vulnerable and open to an assault.

2. Wait inside your house or a business until the ride arrives.

Being outside and alone might create a condition of exposure leaving oneself open to an assault. This also creates an opportunity for a non – sanctioned driver to prey upon a potential victim.

3. Do not ride alone if you’re heavily intoxicated.

There is safety in numbers and heavy intoxication provides for conditions which could allow someone to be victimized, perhaps without knowledge.

4. Confirm the driver is who it is supposed to be.

Technology can provide driver information and vehicle information. Another car or different driver is not going to be sent for you without your being provided with that information.

5. Always use the dispatch or technology-based service.

Do not accept personal cell phone numbers of drivers who promise to pick you up if you call them directly. This undermines safety precautions such as GPS put in place by the companies who operate these services.

6. Do not share personal information with the driver.

A predator will try to gather personal information from you in the course of a casual conversation. Questions such as, “who knows where you are”, and “is there going to be anyone home when you get there”, should be a warning sign for riders.

7. Trust your instincts.

If something does not look right or feel right trust your instinct and seek immediate assistance from a trusted source. If you are already in the vehicle when this feeling of mistrust arises use your cellular telephone to call someone.

8. Do not give your cell phone to the driver.

If the driver asks to see your telephone or offers to assist you with the app, do not give up your phone. This serves to further isolate you from outside assistance and makes you more vulnerable.

Categories: Ohio News

Dublin elementary school locked down lifted, students released to parents

5 hours 12 min ago

DUBLIN -- Dublin Police are searching for a suspect in a burglary in the vicinity of Bailey Elementary School. The school was locked down, but that has since been lifted and the students were released to their parents.

Students were supposed to be released at 3:42 p.m.

Dublin Police released a tweet saying the robbery was in a residential neighborhood and took place in the 4700 block of Donegal Cliffs Drive.

The suspect is a black male in the 20s with facial hair, blue or black coat. It was unknown if the suspect had weapons. The suspect has not been caught.

We are looking for a burglary suspect from the 4700-Blk of Donegal Cliffs Dr. Suspect is male black in his 20’s with facial hair, blue or black coat and a blue or black hat. Unk if the suspect has weapons. If spotted or you have any information about this incident call 911.

— Dublin Police (@DublinPolice) December 11, 2017

Categories: Ohio News

Police responding to shootings south of Merion Village

5 hours 37 min ago

COLUMBUS -- Police are on the scene of a pair of incidents just south of Merion Village.

A fatal shooting occurred in the 200 block of Barthman Avenue a few minutes before 3:30 p.m. Monday.

Two people were shot and one was injured. Two people of interest have been detained. According to police, there were multiple gunshots fired both inside and outside of the home on Barthman Avenue.

One victim was sent to Grant Memorial Hospital but died at 3:38 p.m. The two other people transported also went to Grant Medical Center.

Another shooting occurred in the 200 block of Reeb Avenue also a few minutes before 3:30 p.m.

Sgt. Latta with the Columbus Division of Police said they are asking for help from the public as to why the crime scene was so large.

Stay with 10TV as this story develops.

Categories: Ohio News

Spurned medical marijuana applicant pushes new pot issue

6 hours 27 min ago

A high-profile proponent of marijuana legalization who was spurned as an applicant for a medical marijuana grower's license announced plans on Monday for a 2018 Ohio ballot issue to legalize the sale and possession of marijuana.

The proposal from Green Light Acquisitions would make growing, processing, possessing, selling and using marijuana legal. The measure was announced by Jimmy Gould, CEO of CannAscend, whose grower's proposal was rejected by the Ohio Department of Commerce last month.

Gould said the Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol amendment will be on the ballot next fall. The amendment also would legalize the growing of hemp.


"We will put together the best amendment that we think will pass and does the most good for Ohioans," Gould said.

Gould raised and spent millions of dollars as a backer of the unsuccessful 2015 effort to legalize marijuana in Ohio. In recent days he has criticized the Department of Commerce for hiring a consultant with a drug conviction to help select Ohio's medical marijuana growers.

Gould said Monday the selection system was flawed by incompetence and favoritism. He suggested problems with a second consultant involved in the medical marijuana program. He also alleged someone at the Department of Commerce was looking for a job with the applicants for growers' licenses.

A message was left with the Department of Commerce, which has rejected Gould's criticism of the process and implied he's a sore loser.

Gould's criticism — picked up by some lawmakers and several candidates running for governor — focuses on the 2005 guilty plea in Pennsylvania by consultant Trevor Bozeman at age 20 to charges of manufacturing, possessing and distributing drugs. A marijuana possession charge was dropped.

Bozeman was one of three consultants Ohio selected to help grade the grower applications. The consultants worked with state employees to select the growers. Bozeman has not returned phone and email messages.

Last month, Ohio selected 12 large growers for a total of 24 licenses.

The state will use the consultants next to help score applicants for the medical marijuana processors.

Ohio's medical marijuana law, passed last year, allows people with medical conditions such as cancer and epilepsy to buy and use marijuana if a doctor recommends it. It doesn't allow smoking.

Categories: Ohio News

3 Trump accusers speak out, call for congressional probe

7 hours 58 min ago

WASHINGTON — Three women who have previously accused President Donald Trump of sexual harassment shared their stories on NBC's "Megyn Kelly Today."

Jessica Leeds, Samantha Holvey and Rachel Crooks on Monday told of alleged harassment by Trump spanning decades.

The White House called the claims false and "totally disputed in most cases." It said "the timing and absurdity of these false claims speak volumes."

One of the accusers, Rachel Crooks, called the White House statement "laughable."

Crooks said of sexual misconduct: "I think politicians seem to be immune to this."

Holvey described the pain the women felt after Trump's victory. "We are private citizens and for us to put ourselves out there, to try to show America who this man is, and especially how he views women, for them to say, 'Meh, we don't care,' it hurt."

The women, who first shared their stories before the November 2016 election, were holding a press conference later Monday to call for a congressional investigation into Trump's alleged behavior. They cited the recent revelations of sexual misconduct by prominent men in business, media and politics, for their decision to speak out publicly against Trump once again.

"The environment's different," Holvey said. "Let's try again."

Categories: Ohio News

Repubican Jim Renacci picks Ohio councilwoman as running mate

8 hours 11 min ago

Congressman Jim Renacci selected a former Procter & Gamble executive and Cincinnati councilwoman as his running mate Monday in the Ohio gubernatorial race.

Renacci, a Wadsworth Republican, and Councilwoman Amy Murray will run under the slogan: "Back 2 Business, Not Business As Usual."

Murray, 53, spent 15 years as a leader in Asian business development at P&G, the Cincinnati-based consumer products giant. She has since formed her own consulting firm, Japan Consulting Group.

The Mount Lookout resident was first elected to Cincinnati City Council in 2013.

Murray's addition to the ticket adds gender and geographic diversity to Renacci's ticket as he faces two better known establishment rivals in the state's GOP primary: Lt. Gov. Mary Taylor and Attorney General Mike DeWine, who recently married his campaign to that of gubernatorial rival Jon Husted, the secretary of state.

Republican governor, John Kasich, is term-limited and unable to seek re-election.

A vocal detractor of President Donald Trump, Kasich has continued to preach bipartisanship and political pragmatism despite his defeat in last year's presidential election.

Renacci, one of the wealthiest members of Congress, has modeled his campaign after Trump's, promoting himself as a political outsider after just seven years in Congress and one who could bring his success in business to the governor's office.

The 70-year-old DeWine, among Ohio's best-known politicians, has been in public service nearly all of his adult life, including as lieutenant governor and U.S. senator. The 51-year-old Taylor is a CPA who assumed her first state-level elective office in 2003.

Renacci has labeled his foes "career politicians" and "Columbus fat cats." Murray is considered more establishment-aligned than Renacci and she has remained largely quiet on the issue of the fractious politics of the Trump administration.

She could use her ties to Cincinnati's deep-pocketed donor base to boost Renacci's campaign, which is largely self-funded, so far.

Categories: Ohio News

Pentagon: Transgender people can enlist in military January 1

8 hours 29 min ago

WASHINGTON — The Pentagon is allowing transgender people to enlist in the military beginning Jan. 1, despite President Donald Trump's opposition.

The new policy reflects growing legal pressure on the issue, and the difficult hurdles the federal government would have to cross to enforce Trump's demand to ban transgender individuals from the military. Two federal courts already have ruled against the ban. Potential transgender recruits will have to overcome a lengthy and strict set of physical, medical and mental conditions that make it possible, though difficult, for them to join the armed services.

Maj. David Eastburn, a Pentagon spokesman, says the enlistment of transgender recruits will start Jan. 1 and go on amid the legal battles. The Defense Department also is studying the issue.

Eastburn told The Associated Press on Monday that the new guidelines mean the Pentagon can disqualify potential recruits with gender dysphoria, a history of medical treatments associated with gender transition and those who underwent reconstruction. But such recruits are allowed in if a medical provider certifies they've been clinically stable in the preferred sex for 18 months and are free of significant distress or impairment in social, occupational or other important areas.

Transgender individuals receiving hormone therapy also must be stable on their medication for 18 months.

The requirements make it challenging for a transgender recruit to pass. But they mirror concerns President Barack Obama's administration laid out when the Pentagon initially lifted its ban on transgender service last year.

The Pentagon has similar restrictions for recruits with a variety of medical or mental conditions, such as bipolar disorder.

"Due to the complexity of this new medical standard, trained medical officers will perform a medical prescreen of transgender applicants for military service who otherwise meet all applicable applicant standards," Eastburn said.

Last year, then-Defense Secretary Ash Carter ended the ban on transgender service members, allowing them to serve openly in the military. He said that within 12 months — or by July 2017 — transgender people also would be able to enlist.

Trump, however, tweeted in July that the federal government "will not accept or allow" transgender troops to serve "in any capacity" in the military. A month later, he issued a formal order telling the Pentagon to extend the ban. He gave the department six months to determine what to do about those currently serving.

Trump's decision was quickly challenged in court, and two U.S. district court judges have already ruled against the ban. Part of one ruling required the government to allow transgender individuals to enlist beginning Jan. 1.

The government had asked that the Jan. 1 requirement be put on hold while the appeal proceeds. The Pentagon move Monday signals the growing sense within the government that authorities are likely to lose the legal fight.

"The controversy will not be about whether you allow transgender enlistees, it's going to be on what terms," said Brad Carson, who was deeply involved in the last administration's decisions. "That's really where the controversy will lie."

Carson worried, however, that the Defense Department could opt to comply with a deadline on allowing transgender recruits, but "under such onerous terms that practically there will be none." Carson, who worked for Carter as the acting undersecretary of defense for personnel, said requiring 18 months of stability in the preferred sex is a reasonable time.

"It doesn't have any basis in science," he said, noting that experts have suggested six months is enough. "But as a compromise among competing interests and perhaps to err on the side of caution, 18 months was what people came around to. And that's a reasonable position and defensible."

Categories: Ohio News

Mario Batali tripped up by sexual misconduct allegations

8 hours 48 min ago

NEWARK, N.J. — Mario Batali has surrendered oversight of daily operations at his restaurant empire following reports of sexual misconduct by the celebrity chef over a period of at least 20 years.

The online site Eater New York, part of Vox Media, reported Monday that the incidents involve at least four women, three of whom worked for Batali. One of women, none was named in the story, said that Batali groping her chest after wine had spilled on her shirt. Another said he grabbed her from behind and holding her tightly against his body.

In a prepared statement sent to The Associated Press, Batali said that the complaints "match up" with his past behavior.

"I take full responsibility and am deeply sorry for any pain, humiliation or discomfort I have caused to my peers, employees, customers, friends and family," Batali said.

A spokesperson for Batali & Bastianich Hospitality Group says an employee reported inappropriate behavior by Batali in October. The company told Eater it was the first formal complaint against Batali and that he was reprimanded and required to attend training.

Batali will also take leave from his ABC cooking show, "The Chew."

"We have asked Mario Batali to step away from The Chew while we review the allegations that have just recently come to our attention," the network said Monday. "ABC takes matters like this very seriously as we are committed to a safe work environment. While we are unaware of any type of inappropriate behavior involving him and anyone affiliated with the show, we will swiftly address any alleged violations of our standards of conduct."

A wave of sexual misconduct allegations have upended the political scene and embroiled Hollywood, gaining momentum after shocking allegations of abuse and assault by Harvey Weinstein.

The #metoo movement has brought down Kevin Spacey, Louis C.K., Matt Lauer, and led to resignations in the U.S. House and Senate. There are new calls for President Donald Trump to address sexual misconduct allegations that he's faced. Last week Time magazine named the "silence breakers," those that have shared their stories about sexual assault and harassment, as Person of the Year.

The 57-year-old Batali was well known in culinary circles, taking jobs early in his career as a sous chef at the Four Seasons in Santa Barbara and San Francisco.

His career took off after opening Po in New York City in the early 1990s, and he skyrocketed to fame with the airing of "Molto Mario," a show that ran on the Food Network for eight years, until 2004. It was there that his signature look, a fleece vest, shorts, and orange Crocs, became instantly recognizable to most people.

The Food Network, which was planning to relaunch "Molto Mario," said Monday that it was placing its plans on hold. "Food Network takes matters like this very seriously," it said.

Batali also co-owns restaurants in a handful of cities. The Batali & Bastianich Hospitality Group owns or operates several restaurants, including Babbo in New York, Carnevino Italian Steakhouse in Las Vegas and Pizzeria Mozza in Los Angeles. It's also a partner in Eataly, an Italian food hall and grocer, which has locations in New York, Chicago and Boston.

Batali has long been socially active. The Mario Batali Foundation advocates child nutrition. He has come out forcefully against hydraulic fracturing, a method used to extract oil and gas.

Categories: Ohio News

Love is blind: FBI warns of popular scam with holiday twist

11 hours 29 min ago

COLUMBUS -- The FBI is warning about a popular scam with a holiday twist.

It targets people specifically during this time of year, which can be lonely for some central Ohioans.

The FBI says scammers will try to form an online relationship with you. They might try to get you to send money with lies like this:

"I'm just trying to get home for the holidays—can you help me?"

"I just want to get some gifts for my child this year, but I was laid off."

The so-called "confidence scam" is one of the top two reported rip-offs of the year.

You can get more information from the FBI here.

Categories: Ohio News

Mom killed in Hawaii home, daughter found tied up

11 hours 59 min ago

HONOLULU -- A man and woman remained in custody after they were arrested on suspicion of killing a woman in a Hawaii vacation rental home.

Family of the woman identified her as Telma Boinville, 51, who moved to Hawaii from Brazil in the 1990s.

Honolulu Police Deputy Chief John McCarthy told the Honolulu Star-Advertiser that the woman's body was found Thursday afternoon downstairs in the house on Oahu's North Shore, where she reportedly was a house cleaner for the vacation property.

Police found her 8-year-old daughter upstairs uninjured and tied up, he said.

Boinville's husband, Kevin Emery, told CBS affiliate KGMB his wife was beaten with a baseball bat.

Emery said his wife "was the most beautiful spirit and most beautiful soul."

Police said officers tracked the victim's vehicle to a parking lot in the Honolulu suburb of Mililani and arrested a man and woman nearby.

Stephen Brown, 23, and Hailey Kai Dandurand, 20, were arrested on suspicion of murder, according to police booking records. They could not be reached for comment while in custody in a police cellblock Friday and it was not clear if they had attorneys. Efforts to reach their relatives were unsuccessful.

CBS affiliate KGMB reports the two are being held on bail. Brown's bail is set at $1 million while Dandurand's bail is set at $500,000.

Boinville was passionate about health, Kevin Emery's twin brother Brian Emery, told The Associated Press. She enjoyed surfing, running, yoga, martial arts and baking with healthy ingredients, he said.

She was a part-time teacher at Sunset Beach Elementary School, where she worked with English-language learners, Hawaii Department of Education spokeswoman Donalyn Dela Cruz said.

"This loss has deeply affected our school community," Dela Cruz said. "Sunset Beach Elementary has additional counselors and behavioral health specialists available to help students, staff and their families."

Earlier Friday, Boinville's family and friends gathered at Ke Iki Beach for a celebration of life, KGMB reports.

"She did everything she could to be with people and she would ... celebrate life," said friend Virginia Hebert. "Telma, we love you."

Categories: Ohio News

Woman knocked over in Rite Aid robbery dies from injuries

12 hours 26 min ago

CITRUS HEIGHTS, Calif. — Citrus Heights Police have announced the arrest of the suspect accused of knocking over an elderly woman inside a Rite Aid who later died from her injuries, CBS Sacramento reports.

Kimani Randolph, 21, was arrested in Las Vegas on Thursday. He will be extradited to Sacramento next week.

He is currently in custody for robbery and violation of probation. Charges relating to the death of an 87-year-old woman who was knocked over during his escaped are still being discussed.

Marilyn Stribley died on Saturday, days after she was knocked over while fleeing the scene of a robbery at a Rite Aid near her home.

Her son-in-law says she loved bingo and the community pool and often walked to the nearby Rite Aid.

But that walk turned deadly on Nov. 27 during a pharmacy robbery.

Surveillance video shows three black male suspects between 18 and 30 years old rushing the pharmacy, jumping the counter and demanding drugs. When they got their fill, police say the trio raced out of the store.

One of the suspects, now identified as Randolph, bumped into the 87-year-old Stribley, knocking her hard to the ground. First responders who arrived at the scene say she didn't have a pulse but were able to revive her and take her to the hospital. But Stribley died over the weekend.

Categories: Ohio News

French baby milk maker orders global recall over salmonella fears

13 hours 9 min ago

Baby milk maker Lactalis and French authorities have ordered a global recall of millions of products over fears of salmonella bacteria contamination.

The French company, one of the largest dairy groups in the world, said it has been warned by health authorities in France that 26 infants have become sick since Dec. 1.

According to a list published on the French health ministry's website, the recall affects customers in countries around the world, including: Britain and Greece in Europe, Morocco and Sudan in Africa, Peru and Colombia in South America and Pakistan, Bangladesh and China in Asia. The United States, a major market for Lactalis, is not affected.

Company spokesman Michel Nalet told The Associated Press on Monday that the "precautionary" recall affects "several million" products made since mid-February.

Lactalis said in a statement that the 26 cases of infection were linked to products branded Picot SL, Pepti Junior 1, Milumel Bio 1 and Picot Riz.

It said it is "sincerely sorry for the concern generated by the situation and expresses its compassion and support to the families whose children fell ill."

The symptoms of salmonella infection include abdominal cramps, diarrhea and fever. Most people recover without treatment.

The company said a possible source of the outbreak has been identified in a tower used to dry out the milk at a production site in May. Disinfection and cleaning measures have been put in place at the suspected site in western France.

The health scare started earlier this month when Lactalis was told that 20 infants under six months of age had been diagnosed with salmonella infection. The company ordered a first recall that has been extended to more products at the request of French authorities following new cases of infections.

Lactalis is a privately held company headquartered in Laval, western France. It has 75,000 employees in 85 countries and annual revenues of about 17 billion euros ($20 billion). Its other notable brands include President and Galbani cheeses and Parmalat milk.

Categories: Ohio News

Official: Man had explosive device strapped on before blast in Manhattan

13 hours 44 min ago

NEW YORK — A law enforcement official tells The Associated Press that a man had a pipe bomb strapped to him when it went off on a New York City subway platform.

NYFD said four people were hurt. All were expected to survive.

The explosion happened around 7:30 a.m. Monday. Details were still developing.

The person was arrested and has non-life-threatening injuries.

The official spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak publicly about the incident.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders has tweeted that President Trump has been briefed on the explosion.

Update regarding explosion at 42nd St and 8th Ave, in subway: One male suspect is in custody. No injuries other than suspect at this time. Avoid the area. Subways bypassing #PortAuthority and Times Square Stations. Info is preliminary. pic.twitter.com/bEAdjq8mYc

— NYPD NEWS (@NYPDnews) December 11, 2017

Categories: Ohio News

Athletes, entertainers rush to support bullied Tennessee boy

13 hours 59 min ago

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. — A Tennessee woman's video of her tearful son recounting being bullied at middle school has prompted a wave of support from athletes and entertainers.

Kimberly Jones said in a Facebook post Friday she had just picked up her son, Keaton, from school because he was too afraid to go to lunch.

In the video, Keaton said other students call him ugly, make fun of his nose and tell him he has no friends. He said milk was poured on him and ham was put down his clothes.

"Just out of curiosity, why do they bully?" Keaton said. "What's the point of it? Why do they find joy in taking innocent people and find a way to be mean to them? It's not OK.

"People that are different don't need to be criticized about it. It's not their fault. If you are made fun of, just don't let it bother you."

The video had more than 18 million views as of Sunday, and a crowdsourcing page for Keaton's future education had raised more than $29,000.

"We all know how it feels to want to belong," Jones said in her post, "but only a select few know how it really feels not to belong anywhere."

On Twitter, Tennessee Titans tight end Delanie Walker invited the Jones family to an upcoming game, while University of Tennessee wide receiver Tyler Byrd said he and several teammates plan to visit Keaton at school.

Country music star Kelsea Ballerini tweeted that the next time she comes home to her native Knoxville, she wants to be with Keaton to witness the bullies apologize.

Retired race car driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. said on Twitter he wants Keaton to "add me to your long list of friends," and Snoop Dogg said on Instagram that Keaton "has a friend for life" and that "love is the only way to beat hate."

Categories: Ohio News

Ohio infants relocated because of smoke in hospital

14 hours 7 min ago

DAYTON, Ohio (AP) — Fire officials say up to 10 infants have been relocated safely away from smoke in a southwest Ohio hospital.

Dayton District Fire Chief James Rose tells the Dayton Daily News that Miami Valley Hospital staffers moved the babies from the Berry Women's Center before firefighters arrived in response to the smoke. He says the smoke came from an overheated motor and that crews were able to clear the smoke with ventilation.

Rose said early Monday that most of the smoke was contained from spreading.

He says there were no injuries.

Categories: Ohio News

Deaths from window blinds show need for cord ban, study says

14 hours 48 min ago

Children's injuries and deaths from window blinds have not stalled despite decades of safety concerns, according to a new U.S. study that recommends a complete ban on blinds with cords.

Nearly 17,000 young children were hurt by window blinds between 1990 and 2015, and though most injuries were minor, almost 300 died, the study shows. Most deaths occurred when children became entangled or strangled by the cords.

Injuries continued even after manufacturers adopted voluntary safety standards including warning labels. The industry now has a plan in the works to make cordless blinds the only option at retail stores and online.

The study "should be a huge wake-up call to the public, to the retailers, to the manufacturers and to parents all over the nation to really see how hazardous the cords on the blinds are," said Linda Kaiser of St Louis. Her 1-year-old daughter died in 2002 from strangulation when she pulled a looped hidden cord from a blind and put it around her neck. Kaiser later formed the advocacy group Parents for Window Blind Safety.

While study's data analysis doesn't show an up or down trend in injuries and deaths, the fact that they're still occurring shows that safety standards have been inadequate, said lead author, Dr. Gary Smith, who directs injuries research at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio.

Paul Nathanson, spokesman for the Window Covering Manufacturers Association, said a soon-to-be adopted industry standard drafted with input from the Consumer Product Safety Commission will make corded blinds unavailable in stores and online, although consumers could buy them through custom orders.

The safety commission says windows and window blinds are among the top five hidden hazards in U.S. homes and in a statement, it called the draft standard "a major step forward in protecting children."

That standard is awaiting approval by the American National Standards Institute and is expected to take effect by late 2018, Nathanson said.

Smith said 20 percent are custom blinds and a total ban on corded blinds is needed.

The study was published Monday in the journal Pediatrics .

His research team analyzed 26 years of U.S. government data on emergency room treatment and fatal injuries. The study notes that the dangers have been addressed in medical journal articles as far back as a 1945 report on two accidental hangings in children who survived.

"Seventy years ago we recognized that this was a product that was killing kids," Smith said. "We should put child safety first."

Categories: Ohio News

Monday's Most Wanted: December 11, 2017

14 hours 52 min ago

Monday's Most Wanted is 37-year-old Amanda Lute.

She's wanted by the Franklin County Sheriff's Office for not showing up to court.

Her criminal case goes back to March, where she was charged with aggravated vehicular homicide.

Lute was last known to live near Buckeye Parkway in Grove City.

Call (614) 525-SWAT if you see her.

Categories: Ohio News

Olympian Simone Biles debuts as Texans cheerleader

15 hours 27 min ago

Simone Biles took a break from Olympic training to cheer for her home team.

The four-time gold medalist performed as the first honorary cheerleader for the Houston Texans in Sunday night’s game.

The San Francisco 49ers beat the Texans 26-16, but that didn’t diminish the smile on Biles’ face as she helped pump up the crowd.

I had such an amazing experience cheering at the Texans Game ❤️
Definitely a memory to last forever! pic.twitter.com/dvLmlClfk6

— Simone Biles (@Simone_Biles) December 11, 2017

Categories: Ohio News

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