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Highway patrol identifies 2 who died in small plane crash in Coshocton County

Mon, 04/16/2018 - 09:21

The Ohio State Highway Patrol identified the two people killed in a small plane crash in Coshocton County Monday.

According to OSHP, Edward Zezlina, 67, and Linda O'Brien, 71, were in the plane when it crashed. Zezlina was flying the plane. The couple lives in Grafton, Ohio, in Lorain County.

The crash happened in a remote area only accessible by foot or ATV.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, the flight left Elyria, Ohio and was headed to DeLand, Florida. The plane was a 1971 Beechcraft Bonanza.

The call came in at about 10 a.m. and the crash is located in the 30700 block of County Road 401.

At about 7:25 a.m., the Coshocton County Sheriff received a call that the plane dropped off the radar. The Sheriff's office and highway patrol confirmed the plane did not land at any surrounding airports and began a search. At about 9:50 a.m., a resident reported finding the wreckage.

The National Transportation Safety Board will determine the cause of the crash after further investigation.

The cause of the crash remains under investigation by authorities including the Federal Aviation Administration and local law enforcement.

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Categories: Ohio News

Concealed carry permits in Franklin County expected to hit record level

Mon, 04/16/2018 - 08:33

Local sheriff’s offices say there’s a direct correlation between the topic of gun control and the number of people applying for concealed carry licenses.

“Whether it’s school shootings, terrorism, random acts of violence, nothing seems to motivate people to get a CCW permit more than the discussion of gun control,” says Major Steve Tucker with the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office.

Gun safety has been making headlines ever since the February 14th shooting in Parkland, Florida at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School killed 17 students and staff.

Major Tucker says the movement that soon followed - #NEVERAGAIN – took the discussion of gun control to new heights, which influenced the number of CCW permit applications the sheriff’s office is now experiencing.

“Comparatively, when you look at years past, we’ve seen 6, 7, 10,000 but we’ve never had a year with over 13,000,” Tucker adds.

Another trend often seen with concealed carry permit applications is during a presidential election when the debate over guns rises to the forefront every four years.

In the most recent presidential election in 2016, the Ohio Attorney General’s office issued 117,953 *new* concealed carry licenses. That year also marked the largest number of CCW permits since 2004 when licenses were first issued in the state.

“We see people begin to come into sheriff’s office to apply for CCW applications because people think that there's going to be an overreach on the part of the federal government,” explains Tucker.

Categories: Ohio News

Starbucks CEO hopes to meet with men arrested in Philly shop

Mon, 04/16/2018 - 08:09

PHILADELPHIA — The CEO of Starbucks arrived in Philadelphia hoping to meet with two black men who were arrested when the coffee chain's employees called 911 and said they were trespassing. Meanwhile, protesters took over the shop Monday.

"I would like to have a dialogue with them to make sure we have the opportunity to really understand the situation and they can join me in finding a constructive way to solve this issue," Starbucks' CEO Kevin Johnson on ABC's "Good Morning America" on Monday. He called their arrest "reprehensible."

A call seeking comment from the men's lawyer about any possible meeting wasn't immediately returned.

About two dozen chanting protesters took over the Starbucks location Monday to protest the arrests.

"We don't want this Starbucks to make any money today. That's our goal," said Abdul-Aliy Muhammad, one of the protest's organizers and co-founder of the Black and Brown Workers Collective.

Just before 7:30 a.m., the protesters moved inside and stood in front of the counter, some holding banners reading "End Stop and Frisk," chanting slogans like, "A whole lot of racism, a whole lot of crap, Starbucks coffee is anti-black."

Starbucks regional vice president Camille Hymes attempted to talk to the protesters but was shouted down.

Over the weekend, demonstrators called for the firing of the employee who contacted police, who arrested the men on Thursday.

Officials have said police officers were told the men had asked to use the store's restroom but were denied because they hadn't bought anything and they refused to leave.

Police haven't released the names of the men who were arrested and later released after the district attorney's office said there was lack of evidence that a crime had been committed.

Over the weekend Johnson issued a statement saying the company is investigating its practices, working on training and will reach out to outside experts to make any needed changes that would help prevent such an occurrence from happening again.

"Creating an environment that is both safe and welcoming for everyone is paramount for every store," he said in the statement. "Regretfully, our practices and training led to a bad outcome — the basis for the call to the Philadelphia police department was wrong. Our store manager never intended for these men to be arrested and this should never have escalated as it did."

Categories: Ohio News

7 inmates killed, 17 injured in fights at max security prison

Mon, 04/16/2018 - 04:46
COLUMBIA, S.C. - A South Carolina prisons spokesman says 7 inmates are dead and 17 others required outside medical attention after hours of fighting inside a maximum security prison.

Prisons spokesman Jeff Taillon announced the grim outcome after State Law Enforcement Division agents helped secure Lee Correctional Institution around 3 a.m. Monday.

Taillon said multiple inmate fights that broke out at 7:15 p.m. Sunday.

Taillon said no officers were wounded.

The maximum-security facility in Bishopville houses about 1,500 inmates, some of South Carolina's most violent and longest-serving offenders. Two officers were stabbed in a 2015 fight. One inmate killed another in February.
Categories: Ohio News

Question of sales tax on online purchases goes to high court

Mon, 04/16/2018 - 04:42

Sales Tax: $0.

Online shoppers have gotten used to seeing that line on checkout screens before they click "purchase." But a case before the Supreme Court could change that.

At issue is a rule stemming from two, decades-old Supreme Court cases: If a business is shipping to a state where it doesn't have an office, warehouse or other physical presence, it doesn't have to collect the state's sales tax.

That means large retailers such as Apple, Macy's, Target and Walmart, which have brick-and-mortar stores nationwide, generally collect sales tax from customers who buy from them online. But other online sellers, from 1-800 Contacts to home goods site Wayfair, can often sidestep charging the tax.

More than 40 states are asking the Supreme Court to reconsider that rule in a case being argued Tuesday. They say they're losing out on "billions of dollars in tax revenue each year, requiring cuts to critical government programs" and that their losses compound as online shopping grows. But small businesses that sell online say the complexity and expense of collecting taxes nationwide could drive them out of business.

Large retailers want all businesses to "be playing by the same set of rules," said Deborah White, the president of the litigation arm of the Retail Industry Leaders Association, which represents more than 70 of America's largest retailers.

For years, the issue of whether out-of-state sellers should collect sales tax had to do mostly with one company: Amazon.com. The online giant is said to account for more than 40 percent of U.S. online retail sales. But as Amazon has grown, dotting the country with warehouses, it has had to charge sales tax in more and more places.

President Donald Trump has slammed the company, accusing it of paying "little or no taxes" to state and local governments. But since 2017, Amazon has been collecting sales tax in every state that charges it. Third-party sellers that use Amazon to sell products make their own tax collection decisions, however.

The case now before the Supreme Court could affect those third-party Amazon sellers and many other sellers that don't collect taxes in all states — sellers such as jewelry website Blue Nile, pet products site Chewy.com, clothing retailer L.L. Bean, electronics retailer Newegg and internet retailer Overstock.com. Sellers on eBay and Etsy, which provide platforms for smaller sellers, also don't collect sales tax nationwide.

States generally require consumers who weren't charged sales tax on a purchase to pay it themselves, often through self-reporting on their income tax returns. But states have found that only about 1 percent to 2 percent actually pay.

States would capture more of that tax if out-of-state sellers had to collect it, and states say software has made sales tax collection simple.

Out-of-state sellers disagree, calling it costly and extraordinarily complex, with tax rates and rules that vary not only by state but also by city and county. For example, in Illinois, Snickers are taxed at a higher rate than Twix because foods containing flour don't count as candy. Sellers say free or inexpensive software isn't accurate, more sophisticated software is expensive and that collecting tax nationwide would also subject them to potentially costly audits.

"For small businesses on tight margins, these costs are going to be fatal in many cases," said Andy Pincus, who filed a brief on behalf of eBay and small businesses that use its platform.

The case now before the Supreme Court involves South Dakota, which has no income tax and relies heavily on sales tax for revenue. South Dakota's governor has said the state loses out on an estimated $50 million a year in sales tax that doesn't get collected by out-of-state sellers.

In 2016 the state passed a law requiring those sellers to collect taxes on sales into the state, a law challenging the Supreme Court precedents. The state, conceding it could win only if the Supreme Court reverses course, has lost in lower courts.

South Dakota says the high court's previous decisions don't reflect today's world. The court first adopted its physical presence rule on sales tax collection in a 1967 case dealing with a catalog retailer. At the time, the court was concerned in part about the burden collecting sales tax would place on the catalog company. The court reaffirmed that ruling in 1992.

It's unclear how the justices might align on the question this time. But three justices — Neil Gorsuch, Clarence Thomas and Anthony Kennedy — have suggested a willingness to rethink those decisions. Kennedy has written that the 1992 case was "questionable even when decided" and "now harms states to a degree far greater than could have been anticipated earlier."

"Although online businesses may not have a physical presence in some states, the Web has, in many ways, brought the average American closer to most major retailers," he wrote in suggesting the days of inconsistent sales tax collection may be numbered. "A connection to a shopper's favorite store is a click away regardless of how close or far the nearest storefront."

Categories: Ohio News

NASA spacecraft aims to put mystery planets on galactic map

Mon, 04/16/2018 - 03:49

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — Calling all planets that orbit around bright, nearby stars: NASA's new Tess spacecraft is looking to do a head count.

The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite — Tess for short — is embarking Monday on a two-year quest to find and identify mystery worlds thought to be lurking in our cosmic backyard. The spacecraft aims to add thousands of exoplanets, or planets beyond our solar system, to the galactic map for future study.

Life might be out there, whether microbial or more advanced, and scientists say Tess and later missions will help answer the age-old question of whether we're alone.

"It is very exciting. ... By human nature, we look for exploration and adventure, and this is an opportunity to see what's next," NASA's Sandra Connelly, a science program director, said Sunday on the eve of launch.

Tess is flying on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, scheduled to blast off at 6:32 p.m. Monday from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

Here's a peek at little Tess and its creators' big ambitions.
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SPACECRAFT: At 5 feet (1.5 meters), Tess is shorter than most adults and downright puny compared with most other spacecraft. The observatory is 4 feet across (1.2 meters), not counting the solar wings, which are folded for launch, and weighs just 800 pounds (362 kilograms). NASA says it's somewhere between the size of a refrigerator and a stacked washer and dryer. Four wide-view cameras are surrounded by a sun shade, to keep stray light out as they monitor any dips in brightness from target stars. Repeated dips would indicate a planet passing in front of its star.

ORBIT: Tess will aim for a unique elongated orbit that passes within 45,000 miles of Earth on one end and as far away as the orbit of the moon on the other end. NASA insists there's no chance of Tess hitting any other satellites or running into the moon, which should never be anywhere close. The lunar gravity will keep the spacecraft stabilized in this orbit for decades to come, with no fuel needed. It will take Tess two weeks to circle Earth.

JOB: Tess will scan almost the entire sky during its $337 million mission, staring at hundreds of thousands, even millions of small, faint red dwarf stars. Scientists expect to discover thousands of planets that, over time, will undergo further scrutiny by powerful telescopes in space and on Earth. That's why NASA, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and and other collaborators are targeting stars within hundreds or, at most, thousands of light-years: It will make the detailed searches yet to come that much easier. NASA's planet-hunting pioneer, the Kepler Space Telescope, has spent the past nine years focusing on considerably fainter, more distant stars and discovered nearly three-quarters of the 3,700-plus exoplanets confirmed to date. With Tess, "our planetary census is going to move in" closer to us, MIT researcher Jenn Burt said Sunday. Satellite maker Orbital ATK's Robert Lockwood said he expects Tess to take exoplanet discovery to a whole new level.

ALIEN LIFE: Tess has no instruments capable of detecting life. Its job is to find and characterize planets that will become the main targets of future telescopes. "By looking at such a large section of the sky, this kind of stellar real estate, we open up the ability to cherry-pick the best stars for doing follow-up science," said Burt. NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, once launched in 2020 or so, will probe these planets' atmospheres for potential traces of life. Giant telescopes still in construction or on the draw zing board also will lend a hand.

Categories: Ohio News

Family, friends to gather at funeral for teen trapped in van

Mon, 04/16/2018 - 03:41

CINCINNATI — Authorities in Cincinnati are continuing to investigate why police couldn't find a teenager who got trapped beneath a minivan's rear bench and died at a school parking lot.

Family members and classmates will gather Monday morning for the funeral of 16-year-old Kyle Plush.

Plush died Tuesday after becoming trapped despite calling 911 twice for help and giving his location.

Two Cincinnati police officers and a Hamilton County sheriff's deputy searched but failed to locate him.

An operator who took one of the calls while Plush was trapped and begging for help will return to work Wednesday after being placed on administrative leave.

Cincinnati leaders are calling for a full investigation of the 911 emergency system.

One councilman says questions about what went wrong go beyond just how the 911 dispatchers handled the calls.

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Previous coverage:

"Something has gone terribly wrong": New details on trapped teen's death

Categories: Ohio News

Woman crashes into yoga studio, suffers critical injuries

Mon, 04/16/2018 - 02:24

CLEVELAND — A driver who crashed through the front door of a yoga studio in downtown Cleveland is being treated for critical injuries.

Cleveland police say the Jaws of Life were used to free the woman from the wreckage Sunday morning.

Inner Bliss Yoga Studio says no one was inside the business at the time. They posted a video on Facebook showing the mangled vehicle being pulled out of the building. The studio will remain closed until the entrance can be repaired.

The cause of the crash is unclear.

Categories: Ohio News

Milford Avenue reopens after storage facility fire in Marysville

Mon, 04/16/2018 - 00:56

MARYSVILLE, Ohio -- Firefighters responded to the scene of a fire at a storage facility in Marysville.

The fire started around 2:00 a.m. Monday. The facility is located on Milford Avenue.

Milford Avenue was closed from Stonebrook Drive to Millstone Drive but has now reopened, according to the Marysville Police Department.

There are no reports of injuries.

Categories: Ohio News

James Comey says Trump "morally unfit to be president"

Sun, 04/15/2018 - 22:08

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former FBI Director James Comey says he thinks it's possible the Russians have compromising information on President Donald Trump, that there is "some evidence of obstruction of justice" in the president's actions and that Trump is "morally unfit" for office.

Comey's comments in an ABC News interview that aired Sunday were almost certain to escalate his war of words with the president and further erode a relationship marked by open hostility and name-calling. Hours before the interview aired, the president, who fired Comey last year, unleashed a Twitter outburst that labeled Comey "slippery," suggested he should be put in jail and branded him "the WORST FBI Director in history, by far!"

Comey's televised remarks, coupled with the release of his forthcoming book, offer his version of events surrounding his firing and the investigations into Russian election meddling and Hillary Clinton's email practices. Several of the episodes he describes in detail, including a private conversation about former White House national security adviser Michael Flynn, are central to special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation and his recollections are presumably valuable for prosecutors examining whether the president's actions constitute obstruction of justice.

The FBI director, who until his firing last May led an investigation into possible ties between Russia and the Trump campaign, acknowledged that it was "stunning" to think that Russia could have damaging information about an American president. But he said that in Trump's case, he could not discount the possibility that the president had been compromised.

"These are more words I never thought I'd utter about a president of the United States, but it's possible," Comey told ABC News' chief anchor George Stephanopoulos.

He also answered "possibly" when asked if the president was attempting to obstruct justice when he cleared the Oval Office of other officials last February before encouraging him to close the investigation into Flynn, who by that point was suspected of lying to the FBI about his Russian contacts. The retired general pleaded guilty last December and is now cooperating with Mueller's investigation.

Comey also said he believed that Trump was "morally unfit" to be president and that he treated women like "pieces of meat."

"A person who sees moral equivalence in Charlottesville, who talks about and treats women like they're pieces of meat, who lies constantly about matters big and small and insists the American people believe it — that person's not fit to be president of the United States, on moral grounds," Comey said.

Trump on Sunday rejected Comey's assertion that Trump had sought his loyalty at a January 2017 dinner, saying "I hardly even knew this guy. Just another of his many lies." He also suggested Comey should be imprisoned, saying, "how come he gave up Classified Information (jail), why did he lie to Congress (jail)." There is no indication Comey is under investigation for doing either.

Asked if the president wanted the Justice Department to investigate Comey, White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Sunday on ABC's "This Week" that she was not aware of a specific request. But, she said, "if they feel there was any wrongdoing, they should certainly look into that just as they do on a number of other topics."

But the president's attacks on Comey began even before the interview aired.

He seized on an excerpt shown Saturday in which Comey said his belief that Clinton would beat Trump in the 2016 presidential election was probably a factor in his decision to disclose the investigation into her emails. Comey, Trump tweeted, "was making decisions based on the fact that he thought she was going to win, and he wanted a job. Slimeball!"

That argument was was startling given that Comey's handling of the email investigation, including his disclosure shortly before the election that the FBI had reopened its probe, enraged Democrats. After Clinton's loss, many Democrats blamed Comey, and Clinton herself has said it hurt her election prospects.

Comey again defended his actions, telling ABC that he made what he thought was the best decision at the time. ComHeey said he did not remember "consciously thinking" about the election results as he decided to disclose that the FBI had reopened its investigation into candidate Clinton's email use. But, he acknowledged, "I was operating in a world where Hillary Clinton was going to beat Donald Trump, and so I'm sure that it was a factor."

"I don't remember spelling it out," he added, "but it had to have been that she's going to be elected president and if I hide this from the American people, she'll be illegitimate the moment she's elected, the moment this comes out."

Former Attorney General Loretta Lynch pushed back against Comey's criticism in the book that, early in the Clinton email inquiry, she had instructed him to refer to it as a "matter" rather than an "investigation." In a statement Sunday, Lynch said she was simply following longstanding Justice Department protocol against confirming or denying the existence of an investigation.

Trump fired Comey in May 2017, setting off a scramble at the Justice Department that led to the appointment of Mueller as special counsel overseeing the Russia investigation. Mueller's probe has expanded to include whether Trump obstructed justice by firing Comey. So far, 19 people — including Flynn and Trump's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort —have been charged in the investigation. Flynn and two of the president's campaign aides, Rick Gates and George Papadopoulos, have pleaded guilty and are cooperating with Mueller.

Asked whether he believed Trump ought to be impeached, Comey replied, "I hope not because I think impeaching and removing Donald Trump from office would let the American people off the hook and have something happen indirectly that I believe they're duty bound to do directly. People in this country need to stand up and go to the voting booth and vote their values."

He added: "But you cannot have, as president of the United States, someone who does not reflect the values that I believe Republicans treasure and Democrats treasure and Independents treasure. That is the core of this country. That's our foundation. And so impeachment, in a way, would short circuit that."

Categories: Ohio News

Blue Jackets come away with another OT win, beat Capitals 5-4 to take 2-0 series lead

Sun, 04/15/2018 - 21:24

WASHINGTON — Sergei Bobrovsky made 54 saves, Matt Calvert scored the winner 12:22 into overtime and the Columbus Blue Jackets overcame two goals from Alex Ovechkin beat the Washington Capitals 5-4 in Game 2 on Sunday night to take a 2-0 lead in their first-round playoff series.

Calvert's goal held up after the NHL situation room reviewed the play for a possible offside. Calvert was just onside when Josh Anderson brought the puck into the zone.

Columbus heads home for Games 3 and 4 on Tuesday and Thursday two victories away from advancing to the second round for the first time in franchise history. The Blue Jackets stunned the Metropolitan Division-champion Capitals with back-to-back overtime wins and have the advantage thanks in large part to the play of Bobrovsky.

The two-time Vezina Trophy-winning goaltender continued his playoff reputation rehab tour by keeping his team in the game. Bobrovsky, who entered the arena in a beige trenchcoat as sharp as his play in net, entered these playoffs 3-10 with a 3.73 goals-against average and .887 save percentage but has now stopped 81 of 88 shots through two games.

Cam Atkinson scored twice, Anderson had a goal at even strength and Zack Werenski added one on the power play for the Blue Jackets, who have the odds on their side. In Stanley Cup playoff history, 86.4 percent of teams that take a 2-0 lead in a best-of-seven series have gone on to win it.

Ovechkin looked like a man on a mission trying to tie the series for Washington three nights after coach Barry Trotz called him out for not making enough of an impact in Game 1. Jay Beagle's early goal and Ovechkin's two on the power play put Washington up 3-1 before undisciplined play took its toll.

Penalties to Tom Wilson and Devante Smith-Pelly allowed Columbus to tie the score and take the lead. But a delay of game penalty on Werenski set the stage for T.J. Oshie's tying goal on the power play with 3:35 left.

The game only got to overtime because Braden Holtby stopped all five shots he faced in the third period after replacing Philipp Grubauer, who allowed four goals on 22 shots. Washington outshot Columbus 21-5 in the third as Bobrovsky made several big stops, including one on Nicklas Backstrom when he didn't know where the puck was and another minutes later when a shot banked off the post and his left skate and he covered up in the crease.

NOTES: Columbus improved to 4-1 all-time in playoff overtime games. ... Linesman Steve Barton had to be helped off the ice late in the first period after clipping skates with Anderson and going down clutching his left knee. On site as the standby official, mid-amateur golfer/referee Garrett Rank replaced Barton as the second linesman. ... Columbus C Alexander Wennberg was out after taking a hit to the head from Wilson in Game 1. Coach John Tortorella only called Wennberg "day-to-day" with an upper-body injury. Sonny Milano played his second career playoff game in replacing Wennberg. ... Beagle returning after missing four games with an upper-body injury, Capitals F Jakub Vrana was a healthy scratch after recording an assist and committing two turnovers in 6:58 of ice time in Game 1. ... Commissioner Gary Bettman was in attendance.

Categories: Ohio News

Stapleton, Lambert, Underwood and Vegas win at ACM Awards

Sun, 04/15/2018 - 21:24

The 2018 Academy of Country Music Awards marked a memorable night for the victims of the massive Las Vegas shooting, comeback queen Carrie Underwood and triple-winners Chris Stapleton and Miranda Lambert.

Jason Aldean paid tribute to 58 people who died at the Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas last October when he was named entertainer of the year Sunday for the third consecutive time.

"It's been a rough year," Aldean said, thanking those "that showed us love and support over the last six months."

The ACMs brought the country music community back to Vegas six months after the deadly tragedy. Aldean was performing onstage when the shooting occurred.

"You guys are in our hearts always," Aldean said. "We love Las Vegas. Vegas strong."

Though Aldean beat out Stapleton for the top honor, Stapleton's Sunday was met with many high points: His wife, Morgane, gave birth to twin boys; he celebrated his 40th birthday; and the leading nominee, who didn't attend the show, won male vocalist of the year and album of the year, where he won twice as a singer and producer.

Underwood also had a big night, returning to the stage like an A-List veteran in her first television appearance since injuring her face and wrist last year due to a fall at her home. Her powerhouse vocals shined when she performed her new song, "Cry Pretty," earning a rousing — and long — standing ovation from the audience.

Immediately following the performance, she won vocal event of the year for the dance-infused country song, "The Fighter," with Keith Urban.

"I am still kind of shaking right now," she added, appearing teary-eyed.

"Seeing her stand up there and be so beautiful, she's one of the greatest singers of all-time in any genre of music," Lambert said backstage of Underwood. "I am just proud of her and I know how strong she is and how hard she's worked."

But Lambert's hard work also paid off: She made history when she surpassed Brooks and Dunn as the most decorated act in ACM history with 32 wins on Sunday. Lambert won her ninth consecutive female vocalist of the year trophy and won twice for song of the year — as the performer and co-writer of "Tin Man."

"I cannot believe this. I really can't. ...I love country music. It's my entirely life," Lambert said onstage. "I will never ever take it for granted."

Florida Georgia Line's Tyler Hubbard wore an all-red ensemble and Brian Kelley was in all-white when they hit the stage with pop singer Bebe Rexha to perform the massive hit "Meant to Be," which is spending its 19th week on top of Billboard's Hot country songs chart. It ties Leroy Van Dyke's "Walk On By" as the third longest-running song of all-time on the chart.

The longest-running No. 1 song of all-time on the country charts, Sam Hunt's "Body Like a Back Road," won single record of the year at the ACMs; Hunt didn't attend the show.

Little Big Town sang Elton John's "Rocket Man" in celebration of the icon's new album, "Restoration," which features country singers covering his songs. Kane Brown and Lauren Alaina were impressive when they sang their duet, "What Ifs." Kenny Chesney, Toby Keith, Kelsea Ballerini, Alan Jackson, Lady Antebellum and Dierks Bentley also performed.

McEntire, who performed with Kelly Clarkson, hosted the three-hour show a year after Bryan and Bentley did the job.

"It takes one woman to do the job of two men," she said, earning a rousing applause.

Old Dominion won vocal group of the year, besting Little Big Town and Lady Antebellum.

"This is heavy in a lot of ways," lead singer Matthew Ramsey said, holding the trophy in his hand.

"We're so lucky. Look at us, look at us!" he said about his bandmates, all dressed in trendy suits. "We look good. We feel good. We're friends. And we're having a ball.

"Thank you for letting us make music."

Categories: Ohio News

Police: One person dead after shooting in east Columbus

Sun, 04/15/2018 - 20:09

COLUMBUS -- Police say a person was taken to a local hospital after a shooting in east Columbus left them with life-threatening injuries. But that person succumbed to their injuries.

Police said the call came in about 9:50 p.m. Sunday in the 900 block of Rarig Avenue and the person was taken to Grant Medical Center. They were pronounced dead at 10:13 p.m.

Rarig Avenue at 12th Avenue currently is closed.

Stay with 10TV and 10TV.com as this story develops.

Categories: Ohio News

One dead in west Columbus after shots fired, crash

Sun, 04/15/2018 - 19:44

COLUMBUS -- Police say one person has died as a result of shots fired and a crash in west Columbus Sunday night.

Police said they were called out to the 500 block of South Terrace Avenue on 20-to-30 shots fired.

When they arrived, a person had crashed into a tree and the victim was pronounced dead at the scene.

Dispatchers said they were unsure if the person died as a result of a shooting or the crash.

Stay with 10TV and 10TV.com as this story develops.

Categories: Ohio News

US to hit Russia with new sanctions for aiding Syria's Assad

Sun, 04/15/2018 - 18:40

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump on Sunday defended his use of the phrase "Mission Accomplished" to describe a U.S.-led missile attack on Syria's chemical weapons program, even as his aides stressed continuing U.S. troop involvement and plans for new economic sanctions against Russia for enabling the government of Bashar Assad.

Stepping up the pressure on Syria's president, U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley indicated the sanctions to be announced Monday would be aimed at sending a message to Russia, which she said has blocked six attempts by the U.N. Security Council to make it easier to investigate the use of chemical weapons.

"Everyone is going to feel it at this point," Haley said, warning of consequences for Assad's foreign allies.

"The international community will not allow chemical weapons to come back into our everyday life," she said. "The fact he was making this more normal and that Russia was covering this up, all that has got to stop."

Trump tweeted Sunday that the strike was "perfectly carried out" and that "the only way the Fake News Media could demean was by my use of the term "Mission Accomplished."" He added that he knew the media would "seize" on the phrase, but said it should be used often. "It is such a great Military term, it should be brought back," he wrote.

The Syrian raid was so perfectly carried out, with such precision, that the only way the Fake News Media could demean was by my use of the term “Mission Accomplished.” I knew they would seize on this but felt it is such a great Military term, it should be brought back. Use often!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 15, 2018

Trump tweeted "Mission Accomplished" on Saturday after U.S., French and British warplanes and ships launched more than 100 missiles nearly unopposed by Syrian air defenses. While he declared success, the Pentagon said the pummeling of three chemical-related facilities left enough others intact to enable the Assad government to use banned weapons against civilians if it chooses.

A perfectly executed strike last night. Thank you to France and the United Kingdom for their wisdom and the power of their fine Military. Could not have had a better result. Mission Accomplished!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) April 14, 2018

His choice of words recalled a similar claim associated with President George W. Bush following the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq. Bush addressed sailors aboard a Navy ship in May 2003 alongside a "Mission Accomplished" banner, just weeks before it became apparent that Iraqis had organized an insurgency that would tie down U.S. forces for years.

Later Sunday, Trump sent a letter to congressional leaders informing them in writing of his decision to order the strike. Under the War Powers Resolution, the president must keep Congress informed of such actions.

Haley made clear the United States won't be pulling troops out of Syria right away, saying U.S. involvement there "is not done."

Haley said the three U.S. goals for accomplishing its mission are making sure chemical weapons are not used in a way that could harm U.S. national interests, defeating the Islamic State group and having a good vantage point to watch what Iran is doing.

"We're not going to leave until we know we've accomplished those things," she said.

Haley said the joint military strike "put a heavy blow into their chemical weapons program, setting them back years" and reiterated that if Assad uses poison gas again, "the United States is locked and loaded."

French President Emmanuel Macron said Sunday that France wants to launch a diplomatic initiative over Syria that would include Western powers, Russia and Turkey. Speaking on French television BFM and online site Mediapart, Macron stressed that the French diplomacy is able to talk with Iran, Russia and Turkey on one side and to the United States on the other side.

He said, "Ten days ago, President Trump wanted to withdraw from Syria. We convinced him to remain."

The nighttime assault on Syria was carefully limited to minimize civilian casualties and avoid direct conflict with Russia, but confusion arose over the extent to which Washington warned Moscow in advance. The Pentagon said it gave no explicit warning. The U.S. ambassador in Moscow, John Huntsman, said in a video, "Before we took action, the United States communicated with" Russia to "reduce the danger of any Russian or civilian casualties."

Russia has military forces, including air defenses, in several areas of Syria to support Assad in his long war against anti-government rebels.

Russia and Iran called the use of force by the United States and its French and British allies a "military crime" and "act of aggression." The U.N. Security Council rejected a Russian resolution calling for condemnation of the "aggression" by the three Western allies.

Assad denies he has used chemical weapons, and the Trump administration has yet to present hard evidence of what it says precipitated the allied missiles attack: a chlorine gas attack on civilians in Douma on April 7. The U.S. says it suspects that sarin gas also was used.

"Good souls will not be humiliated," Assad tweeted while hundreds of Syrians gathered in Damascus, the capital, where they flashed victory signs and waved flags in scenes of defiance after the early morning barrage.

The strikes "successfully hit every target," said Dana W. White, the chief Pentagon spokeswoman. The military said there were three targets: the Barzah chemical weapons research and development site in the Damascus area, a chemical weapons storage facility near Homs and a chemical weapons "bunker" a few miles from the second target.

Although officials said the singular target was Assad's chemical weapons capability, his air force, including helicopters he allegedly has used to drop chemical weapons on civilians, were spared. In a U.S. military action a year ago in response to a sarin gas attack, missiles took out nearly 20 percent of the Syrian air force, the Pentagon said.

The U.S.-led operation won broad Western support. The NATO alliance gave its full backing; NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg said the attack was about ensuring that chemical weapons cannot be used with impunity.

In his televised address from the White House on Friday, Trump said the U.S. was prepared to keep up the economic, diplomatic and military pressure on Assad until he ends a pattern of killing his own people with internationally banned chemical weapons.

That did not mean military strikes would continue. In fact, Gen. Joseph Dunford, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said no additional attacks were planned.

Asked about Trump's "Mission Accomplished" assertion, White said it pointed to the successful targeting of the three Syrian chemical weapons sites. What happens next, she said, is up to Assad and to his Russian and Iranian allies.

Haley appeared on "Fox News Sunday" and CBS' "Face the Nation."

Categories: Ohio News

R. Lee Ermey, best known as 'Full Metal Jacket' sergeant, dies at 74

Sun, 04/15/2018 - 18:19

LOS ANGELES (AP) — R. Lee Ermey, a former Marine who made a career in Hollywood playing hard-nosed military men like Gunnery Sgt. Hartman in Stanley Kubrick's "Full Metal Jacket," has died.

Ermey's longtime manager Bill Rogin says he died Sunday morning from pneumonia-related complications. He was 74.

The Kanas native was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for his memorable performance in "Full Metal Jacket," in which he immortalized lines such as: "What is your major malfunction?"

Born Ronald Lee Ermey in 1944, Ermey served 11 years in the Marine Corps and spent 14 months in Vietnam and then in Okinawa, Japan, where he became staff sergeant. His first film credit was as a helicopter pilot in Francis Ford Coppola's "Apocalypse Now," which was quickly followed by a part in "The Boys in Company C" as a drill instructor.

He raked in more than 60 credits in film and television across his long career in the industry, often playing authority figures in everything from "Se7en" to "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre" remake.

The part he would become most well-known for, in "Full Metal Jacket," wasn't even originally his. Ermey had been brought on as a technical consultant for the 1987 film, but he had his eyes on the role of the brutal gunnery sergeant and filmed his own audition tape of him yelling out insults while tennis balls flew at him. An impressed Kubrick gave him the role.

Kubrick told Rolling Stone that 50 percent of Ermey's dialogue in the film was his own.

"In the course of hiring the marine recruits, we interviewed hundreds of guys. We lined them all up and did an improvisation of the first meeting with the drill instructor. They didn't know what he was going to say, and we could see how they reacted. Lee came up with, I don't know, 150 pages of insults," Kubrick said.

According to Kubrick, Ermey also had a terrible car accident one night in the middle of production and was out for four and half months with broken ribs.

Ermey would also go on to voice the little green army man Sarge in the "Toy Story" films. He also played track and field coach and Nike co-founder Bill Bowerman in "Prefontaine," General Kramer in "Toy Soldiers" and Mayor Tilman in "Mississippi Burning."

Ermey also hosted the History Channel series "Mail Call" and "Lock N' Load with R. Lee Ermey" and was a board member for the National Rifle Association, as well as a spokesman for Glock.

"He will be greatly missed by all of us," Rogin said. "It is a terrible loss that nobody was prepared for."

Rogin says that while his characters were often hard and principled, the real Ermey was a family man and a kind and gentle soul who supported the men and women who serve.

Categories: Ohio News

One person injured in possible apartment building explosion near OU campus

Sun, 04/15/2018 - 16:39

ATHENS, Ohio -- According to a release from the City of Athens, a report of an explosion injured one person in an apartment building on West Union Sunday afternoon.

The city issued a release saying that the person was transported to O'Bleness Memorial Hospital. All other residents of the building are accounted for. The incident occurred at 104 West Union Street at about 5:15 p.m. Sunday.

The cause of the reported explosion is currently not known.

According to a 10TV crew on the scene, personnel from Columbia Gas have responded to the area.

The State Fire Marshal is conducting an investigation of the incident.

Columbia Gas communications manager Dave Rau said the company has tested its lines from the main to the meter and is confident that their facilities were not involved in the issue.

More information will be provided as it becomes available.

The Ohio University Police first alerted the public to the possible explosion. They said there was a partial structural collapse due to a possible explosion in the 100 block of West Union Street. West Union is closed to all traffic from High Street west to the traffic circle. Avoid the area.

— OhioUniversityPolice (@oupolice) April 15, 2018

About an hour after its original tweet, the Ohio University Police Department said the issue was stabilized. It also said the area was closed until further notice.

The situation on West Union Street is stabilized at this time. West Union remains closed to all traffic between High Street and Depot Street until further notice.

— OhioUniversityPolice (@oupolice) April 15, 2018

Stay with 10TV and 10TV.com on this developing story.

Categories: Ohio News

Ohio State plans to bring Wi-Fi to entire Columbus campus

Sun, 04/15/2018 - 16:12

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio State University says it will spend nearly $19 million updating Wi-Fi access, including at its football stadium and basketball arena.

Ohio State trustees on Friday approved a plan to install wireless networking access points across the Columbus campus. University officials say they expect the project will be completed by December 2020 and will be funded by university and auxiliary funding.

Work on the Wi-Fi project is expected to begin next month.

Officials say wireless access will be available in Ohio Stadium and in the Schottenstein Center by fall of 2019.

The Columbus Dispatch reports trustees also approved a $95 million plan to renovate the College of Dentistry.

Categories: Ohio News

Boston marks 5 years since marathon attack with tributes

Sun, 04/15/2018 - 15:29

BOSTON — The bells of Old South Church in Boston rang at 2:49 p.m. to commemorate a citywide moment of silence in honor of Boston Marathon bombing survivors and victims

It was an emotional moment in a day filled with service projects and ceremonies to remember those impacted by the deadly bombings five years ago.

Boston began the anniversary of the attacks Sunday with Mayor Marty Walsh and Gov. Charlie Baker laying wreaths early in the morning at the spots along downtown Boylston Street where two bombs killed three spectators and maimed more than 260 others April 15, 2013.

Both addressed families and survivors at a private ceremony inside the Boston Public Library.

"On April 15, 2013, our city changed forever but over the last five years, we have reclaimed hope. We have reclaimed the finish line and Boston has emerged with a new strength, a resilience rooted in love," Walsh said.

Jane and Henry Richard, siblings of the youngest victim Martin Richard, and members of the family's foundation, also spoke.

Henry Richard urged those listening to follow Martin's message to "choose kindness and do more." The family's foundation was founded in 2014 to connect young people with opportunities for volunteerism and community engagement.

Victim Lu Lingzi's uncle, Sherman Yee, was present at the ceremony and private gathering. He said, "The family has been overwhelmed by love and support from all over the world.'" He called Lingzi an "extraordinary girl" who represented the youth that come to the U.S. from China to study.

"While she didn't realize her dreams, as her family we invest in the youths through our foundation to keep her memory going," he said.

The bombs also killed 29-year-old Krystle Campbell, of Arlington. Massachusetts Institute of Technology police officer Sean Collier was killed in the line of duty during a confrontation with bomber Tamerlan Tzarneav.

Roxanne Simmonds was at commemorative ceremonies to honor her son, fallen Boston police officer Dennis Simmonds. Simmonds suffered a head injury on April 19, 2013, during a shootout with Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev as law enforcement closed in on them.

He suffered a fatal brain aneurysm a year later assessed to be the result of his injuries from the explosive device. Roxanne Simmonds said "DJ" was "brilliant and fearless — he just loved Boston."

The youngest graduate of his class at Lasell College, Dennis Simmonds worked in Mattapan as an officer.

"It was important for him to be in a community with men and women who look like him," his mother said. "Individuals of color working hard to make sure their communities were safe." She praised Walsh, saying that it was obvious how significant the victims are to the mayor.

Arreen Andrew, of Boston, said she was in the crowd across the stand when the first bomb went off in 2013.

"It was sheer panic," she recalled. "Just this sense of 'No, this can't happen to us.'"

Five years later, while the day is still a reminder of some painful memories, she said it has also become a day about the relationships that have since been formed and "reformed and recreated our entire community."

For some, such an anniversary is about planting the seeds of change. Forty-three-year-old Heather Abbott of Newport, Rhode Island hosted a fundraiser for her foundation that supports amputees. Abbott was outside of Forum, a restaurant by the finish line, when the impact of the second bomb blew her through the entrance of the building. Former New England Patriots lineman Matt Chatham and his wife Erin were in the restaurant, and carried Abbott to safety.

After three surgeries in four days, Abbott's left leg was amputated below the knee. Her recovery was long, but in 2014, Abbott started her own foundation to help amputees with financial difficulties afford prosthetics and expensive co-payments.

"I want to make some changes in the world of health insurance and help them understand why people need these devices," said Abbott.

Abbott says the foundation has given out 19 prosthetic devices out so far. "They can cost from $15,000 to as much as $100,000," she said.

Categories: Ohio News

Spokesman: Former first lady Barbara Bush in failing health

Sun, 04/15/2018 - 12:15

HOUSTON -- Former first lady Barbara Bush is in "failing health" and won't seek additional medical treatment, a Bush family spokesman said Sunday.

"Following a recent series of hospitalizations, and after consulting her family and doctors, Mrs. Bush, now age 92, has decided not to seek additional medical treatment and will instead focus on comfort care," spokesman Jim McGrath said in a news release.

McGrath did not elaborate as to the nature of Bush's health problems. She has been treated for decades for Graves' disease, which is a thyroid condition, had heart surgery in 2009 for a severe narrowing of her main heart valve and was hospitalized a year before that for surgery on a perforated ulcer.

"It will not surprise those who know her that Barbara Bush has been a rock in the face of her failing health, worrying not for herself — thanks to her abiding faith — but for others," McGrath said. "She is surrounded by a family she adores, and appreciates the many kind messages and especially the prayers she is receiving."

Bush, who is at home in Houston, is one of only two first ladies who was also the mother of a president. The other was Abigail Adams, wife of John Adams, the nation's second president, and mother of John Quincy Adams, the sixth president.

Bush married George H.W. Bush on Jan. 6, 1945. They had six children and have been married longer than any presidential couple in American history.

Eight years after she and her husband left the White House, Mrs. Bush stood with her husband as their son George W. was sworn in as the 43rd president.

President Donald Trump's press secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, said in a statement Sunday evening that "the President's and first lady's prayers are with all of the Bush family during this time."

Bush is known for her white hair and her triple-strand fake pearl necklace.

Her brown hair began to gray in the 1950s, while her 3-year-old daughter Pauline, known to her family as Robin, underwent treatment for leukemia and eventually died in October 1953. She later said dyed hair didn't look good on her and credited the color to the public's perception of her as "everybody's grandmother."

Her pearls sparked a national fashion trend when she wore them to her husband's inauguration in 1989. The pearls became synonymous with Bush, who later said she selected them to hide the wrinkles in her neck. The candid admission only bolstered her common sense and down-to-earth public image.

Her 93-year-old husband, the nation's 41st president who served from 1989 to 1993, also has had health issues in recent years. In April 2017, he was hospitalized in Houston for two weeks for a mild case of pneumonia and chronic bronchitis. He was hospitalized months earlier, also for pneumonia. He has a form of Parkinson's disease and uses a motorized scooter or a wheelchair for mobility.

Before being president, he served as a congressman, CIA director and Ronald Reagan's vice president.

Barbara Pierce Bush was born June 8, 1925, in Rye, New York. Her father was the publisher of McCall's and Redbook magazines. She and George H.W. Bush married when she was 19 and while he was a young naval aviator. After World War II, the Bushes moved to Texas where he went into the oil business.

Along with her memoirs, she's the author of "C. Fred's Story" and "Millie's Book," based on the lives of her dogs. Proceeds from the books benefited adult and family literacy programs. The Barbara Bush Foundation for Family Literacy began during her White House years with the goal of improving the lives of disadvantaged Americans by boosting literacy among parents and their children. The foundation partners with local programs and had awarded more than $40 million as of 2014 to create or expand more than 1,500 literacy programs nationwide.

Categories: Ohio News

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